Education

Nayeli Trujillo, Tomson 290
507-786-3245

wp.stolaf.edu/education

The Education Department prepares highly qualified, reflective teachers who integrate the liberal arts, their subject matter, and professional education. Reflective teacher candidates assess their options and make sound professional decisions based on practical, pedagogical, and ethical criteria. Teacher candidates develop leadership skills and contribute to the profession and to society. 

Most graduates completing the teacher education program choose employment as educators in K-12 (kindergarten through grade 12) classrooms in the U.S. or abroad. Many also attend graduate school in special education, counseling, or related human services fields. Among baccalaureate - liberal arts institutions, St. Olaf ranks fourth in the nation in the number of graduates who earn Ph.D.s in education.

Overview of the Educational Studies Concentration

The educational studies concentration offers students from all areas of the liberal arts an opportunity to strengthen their program of study with selected courses that focus on some feature of education. Educational studies provides important foundational work toward achieving a number of post-baccalaureate goals including various vocations (e.g., management, arts education, coaching, environmental education, youth ministry, classroom teaching, teaching English abroad) and service opportunities (e.g., Peace Corps, Lutheran Volunteer Corps).

The requirements for the program include core courses within the Education Department and interdisciplinary elective options.

Intended Learning Outcomes for the Concentration

Organization of the Concentration

The educational studies concentration is offered in three different tracks to best meet the needs of a variety of student interests.

  1. Licensure Track - for those students intending to complete the Teacher Education Program and obtain a teaching license (requires an application and acceptance into the Teacher Education Program)
  2. Non-Licensure Track - for those students who have an interest in education but are not seeking a teaching license
  3. TEFL Certificate - for those students seeking to obtain a Teaching English as a Foreign Language certificate (TEFL certification is indicated on students' transcripts; physical certificates are not distributed)

Overview of the Teacher Education Program

The St. Olaf Teacher Education Program is approved by the Minnesota Board of Teaching (BOT) to recommend its graduates for teaching licensure in Minnesota. To be eligible for a teaching license through St. Olaf, students must meet the BOT requirements of their teaching content area (English, mathematics, music, social studies, etc.), complete a major in this same content area (except for ESL), complete all B.A. or B.M. requirements (including a graduation major), and complete all required Education courses and experiences (see requirements tab).

The Higher Education Act, Title II, Section 207, requires all institutions that prepare teachers to report pass rates on state licensing tests. In Minnesota, teacher candidates are required to pass basic skills tests in reading, writing, and mathematics, as well as additional tests in pedagogy and content area. Students seeking licensure in other states should contact the teacher licensure agency in those states.

Note: Because of periodic changes in licensure requirements, check with the Education Department regarding your program.

The requirements of the social studies education major are described elsewhere in this catalog.

St. Olaf offers these licenses in education:

  1. Secondary school teaching (grades 5-12) in the following academic areas: communication arts and literature (English, communications); mathematics; science 9-12 (biology, chemistry, physics) and 5-8 general science; social studies (economics, history, geography, political science, psychology, sociology/anthropology)
  2. Kindergarten-grade 12 in the following academic areas: English as a second language (ESL); music (vocal/classroom, instrumental/classroom teaching); theater; visual art; world languages (French, German, Latin, Spanish)

St. Olaf does not offer its own elementary (K-6) classroom teaching licensure. Students may begin to work toward their license while studying at St. Olaf and complete the requirements after graduation at several different institutions. Contact Robert McClure, Associate Professor of Education, for further information.

Intended Learning Outcomes for the Program

Student Teaching Opportunities

Student Teaching Locally

Students indicate preferences for student teaching placement areas that are within a 60-mile radius of St. Olaf. The college has collaborative arrangements with over a dozen school districts in urban, suburban, and rural settings. A vehicle or access to public transportation is needed for transportation to the school.  Students are not permitted to student teach in their home schools. 

Student Teaching Abroad

Students may apply to student teach in India. Students must apply for a student teaching abroad placement by Oct. 1 one year in advance of the academic year in which the placement will be made. Applicants are screened by the Director of Student Teaching Abroad. In addition to all other requirements for student teaching, students must be recommended by the chairs of their content area department(s) and the Education Department and have exemplary portfolios. These placements meet all the requirements for Minnesota licensure. Offered annually in the fall semester. Contact Elizabeth Leer, Director of Student Teaching Abroad, for further information. 

Student Teaching in Arizona

A limited number of students can student teach in Tucson, Arizona. Although the majority of K-12 students are Mexican-American and are multilingual, a knowledge of the Spanish language is not necessary. Contact Rosie Pfarr-Baker, Director of Field Experiences and Licensure, for further information.

Requirements of the Educational Studies Concentration (5.5 credits)

Up to a maximum of two courses either taken off-campus with non-St. Olaf faculty or transferred from other instiutions may be included in the concentration. Not more than one course graded S/U may count toward the concentration. A minimum overall GPA of 2.7 is required for this concentration to be awarded. 

Licensure Track

Concentration Core Courses2.5
Educational Psychology
Principles of Education, K-12
Counseling and Communication in Schools (0.50)
Extensive Interim Field Experience
Select one of the following:1.00
Teaching ESL, K-12
Multicultural Education in Hawaii: Seminar and Practicum (off-campus)
Urban Education Practicum and Seminar (off-campus)
Electives
Select two credits of the following with an educational or social/cultural theme:2.00
American Racial and Multicultural Literatures
Children's and Young Adult Literature
Introduction to Coaching (0.50)
Family Relationships
Media and Screen Cultures
World Music
Principles of Psychology
Conditioning and Learning
Developmental Psychology
Parenting and Child Development in Diverse Families
Contemporary Native American Issues
Race and Class in American Culture
Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies
Total Credits5.5

Non-licensure Track

Concentration Core Courses2.50
Foundations in Education
Educational Psychology
Counseling and Communication in Schools (0.50)
Extensive Interim Field Experience
Select one of the following:1.00
Urban Schools and Communities (off-campus)
Exploring Teaching (off-campus)
Multicultural Education in Hawaii: Seminar and Practicum (off-campus)
Electives
Select 2 credits of the following with an educational or social/cultural theme:2.00
American Racial and Multicultural Literatures
Children's and Young Adult Literature
Introduction to Coaching (0.50)
Family Relationships
Media and Screen Cultures
World Music
Principles of Psychology
Conditioning and Learning
Developmental Psychology
Parenting and Child Development in Diverse Families
Contemporary Native American Issues
Race and Class in American Culture
Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies
Total Credits5.5

TEFL Certificate Track

Core Courses2.50
Teaching and Learning English Grammar (0.50)
English Language Learners: Issues in Education
Foundations in Education
Extensive Interim Field Experience1.00
Exploring Teaching (off-campus)
Electives
Select 2 credits of the following with an educational or social/cultural theme:2.00
American Racial and Multicultural Literatures
Children's and Young Adult Literature
Introduction to Coaching (0.50)
Family Relationships
English Language and Linguistics
Media and Screen Cultures
World Music
Principles of Psychology
Conditioning and Learning
Developmental Psychology
Parenting and Child Development in Diverse Families
Contemporary Native American Issues
Race and Class in American Culture
Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies
Total Credits5.5

Teacher Education Program Requirements and Procedures

Overall Requirements for a Teaching License and Admission Criteria

Education courses and field experiences have been aligned to meet all of the Minnesota BOT standards for licensure. In order to be recommended for licensure by St. Olaf College, students must meet all of the requirements and make regular progress through transition points in the program. Transitions require approval by the Education Department faculty.

The licensure process and criteria are described below. Consult Education Department faculty for further information and clarification.

Overview of Licensure Process and Assessment Model Transition Points

  1. Applicant to Candidate:
    • Carry a minimum overall and content area GPA of 2.7 to enter Teacher Education Program

    • Participate in initial interviews with education and content area faculty

    • Obtain approval of teacher education application

    • Earn a B- or better in EDUC 290

    • Receive rating of "Basic" or better on Disposition Assessments on Field Experience Evaluations

    • Successfully complete 20 hours field experience in EDUC 290

    • Meet SEP standards in EDUC 290

    • Take Basic Skills tests

    • Successfully complete other content-area requirements (e.g., entrance into music program, interview with world language faculty member)

  2. Candidate to Student Teacher:
    • Maintain a minimum overall and content area GPA of 3.0

    • Earn a B- or better in all education courses

    • Receive rating of "Basic" or better on all Disposition Assesments and Field Experience Evaluations

    • Successfully complete advanced field experience(s) in EDUC 330 and other courses

    • Complete an Interim field experience in a diverse classroom setting  (minimum of 80 hours)

    • Complete a minimum 120 hours total of field experience

    • Meet SEP standards embedded in all education courses

    • Successfully complete Candidate Presentation

    • Pass all Basic Skills tests

    • Take all Pedagogy and Content tests

  3. Student Teacher to Minnesota teaching license:
    • Earn a B- or better in all education courses

    • Receive rating of "Basic" or better on all Disposition Assessments and Field Experience Evaluations

    • Successfully complete student teaching

    • Present evidence demonstrating competency in all Minnesota content area standards and the Standards of Effective Practice (SEP) to education faculty

    • Meet SEP and content standards embedded in student teaching

    • Participate in exit interview with the Director of Field Experiences

    • Complete Minnesota teaching license application

    • Pass all licensure tests

Students at each transition point must also meet the following requirements:

  • Receive approval of the Dean of Students Office

  • Demonstrate speech and writing proficiency in English

  • Maintain a satisfactory health record

  • Pass criminal background checks as needed

Required Courses, Clinical Field Experiences, and Sequence

Content area requirements for individual licensure areas can be accessed at this link on the Education Department website: http://wp.stolaf.edu/education/licenses/

First Year
EDUC 170Urban Schools and Communities (off-campus) (recommended elective course; offered during Interim) 11.00
Informational sessions are offered during Week One orientation and in April prior to registration in the spring. Students are encouraged to focus on their general education requirements and their prospective teaching major.
Sophomore Year
Candidates are encouraged to focus on their general education requirements, their major, a second teaching area, such as ESL (English as a Second Language), and multicultural experiences. Planning with members of the Education Department and their content area is required.
EDUC 170Urban Schools and Communities (off-campus) (if not take in first year; offered during Interim)1.00
EDUC 231Drugs and Alcohol (0 Cr)0.00
EDUC 290Educational Psychology1.00
Junior Year
Most students have their teacher education application approved prior to their junior year. Courses are sequenced.
EDUC 231Drugs and Alcohol (0 Cr) (if not taken in sophomore year)0.00
EDUC 290Educational Psychology (if not taken in sophomore year)1.00
EDUC 291Standards and Technology (0 Cr) (taken concurrently EDUC 330)0.00
EDUC 330Principles of Education, K-12 (after EDUC 290, before special methods)1.00
EDUC 372Counseling and Communication in Schools (0.50)0.50
EDUC 374Reading in the Content Area (0.50) (after EDUC 330)0.50
EDUC 375Differentiated Instruction for Exceptional Learners (0.50)0.50
an EDUC Interim course1.00
EDUC 3XX: Special Methods of Teaching (in content area) (after EDUC 330, before student teaching)1.00
Senior Year
Students may register for student teaching (EDUC 381, 382, 385, 389) in fall or spring semester; no other courses may be taken during student teaching. Students may also student teach post graduate, in which case EDUC 3XX: Special Methods of Teaching should be taken senior year.
EDUC 372Counseling and Communication in Schools (0.50) (if not taken in junior year)0.50
EDUC 374Reading in the Content Area (0.50) (if not taken in junior year)0.50
EDUC 375Differentiated Instruction for Exceptional Learners (0.50) (if not taken in junior year)0.50
an EDUC Interim course (if not taken in junior year)1.00
EDUC 3XX: Special Methods of Teaching (in content area) (if student teaching post graduate)1.00
EDUC 381Senior Seminar (0.50)0.50
EDUC 382Human Relations (0 Cr) (experiential component met in required Interim course)0.00
EDUC 385Issues in Education (0.50)0.50
EDUC 389Student Teaching (3.0)3.00
Post Graduate
Students are eligible for a reduced tuition charge for an additional semester to complete student teaching. 2
EDUC 381Senior Seminar (0.50)0.50
EDUC 382Human Relations (0 Cr) (experiential component met in required Interim course)0.00
EDUC 385Issues in Education (0.50)0.50
EDUC 389Student Teaching (3.0)3.00
1

Does not count as EDUC interim requirement for licensure

2

 Their baccalaureate degree from St. Olaf must be completed in advance. See the Education Department or the registrar for guidelines.

 
 

EDUC 170: Urban Schools and Communities (off-campus)

In this course, students examine how schools and communities in the Twin Cities interact to provide support and developmental opportunities for school-age children. Through lectures, readings, discussions, field trips, and in-school and co-curricular placements, students gain an understanding and awareness of how race, class, ethnicity, national origin, and gender shape the complex character of urban youth and schools. Students spend one week in orientation activities on campus and two weeks in the Twin Cities. During the time in the Twin Cities, St. Olaf students participate as tutors and classroom assistants during the school day and then assist in various after-school and community programs. The last week of Interim is spent back on campus discussing the experience. P/N only. Open to first-year students. Offered during Interim. Counts toward race and ethnic studies and American studies majors and race and ethnic studies concentration.

EDUC 231: Drugs and Alcohol (0 Cr)

Students examine issues related to chemical use/abuse in our society. The course, required of all candidates for a teaching license, enhances problem identification and helping skills instudents' professional and personal lives. Students develop an understanding of enabling and intervening behaviors and gain knowledge about the role of schools in addressing these and other chemical abuse concerns. P/N only. Offered each semester, evenings.

EDUC 245: Teaching and Learning English Grammar (0.50)

Research clearly shows that labeling isolated sentence components with grammatical terms, drilling workbook exercises, and diagramming sentences are ineffective classroom practices. What can teachers do to help their students gain mastery of standard written English? In this half-credit course, students explore both the theory and practice of contextual grammar instruction. Students also hone their own grammatical knowledge, applying their new knowledge of both content and pedagogy through in-class micro-teachings. Offered annually in the second-half of the spring semester. Counts toward linguistic studies concentration.

EDUC 246: English Language Learners: Issues in Education

This course focuses on issues surrounding first and second language acquisition in children and adults. It examines socio-cultural, linguistic, and psychological factors that affect language learning, cultural identity, and school performance, highlighting political influences on the education of linguistic minorities. This is a theory and foundations course required for students seeking MN teaching licensure in ESL; it is also relevant for students who wish to teach English as a foreign language abroad. Required 20-hour field experience. Offered annually in the fall semester. Counts toward race and ethnic studies major and concentration and linguistic studies concentration.

EDUC 260: Foundations in Education

This introductory course addresses the educational experience in the United States with specific focus on the experience of non-dominant groups within the U.S. Students examine the philosophy, history, politics, and sociology of the U.S. educational system. Topics are addressed through a central text as well as current literature and supplementary readings, highlighting the interaction of schools and communities. Students gain practical experience in aneducational setting through a required field experience. In a final project, students develop and express their own philosophy of education based on their particular area of interest. Required 20-hour field experience. Offered annually. Counts toward American studies major and race and ethnic studies major and concentration.

EDUC 270: Exploring Teaching (off-campus)

This course provides full-time placement in a school setting for students wanting to explore a career in teaching or gain greater understanding of teaching as a profession. Directed by host teachers, students may observe, assist within the classroom, tutor, teach, coach, attend faculty meetings and functions, and meet with school personnel. Students attend weekly seminars and complete assigned readings and reflective writings. Counts as the interim requirement for the non-licensure and TEFL certificate education concentration.
Prerequisite: EDUC 260 or EDUC 290.

EDUC 290: Educational Psychology

Students study theories of and research into human behavior, growth, and development. Through lectures, discussions, case studies and field experiences, students analyze the impact of applied psychology upon schools, teachers, and students. Students also examine the interaction between individual characteristics and needs and political, economic and philosophical issues confronting contemporary American students. Required 20-hour field experience. Recommended to be taken sophomore year to begin the licensure sequence. Offered each semester.

EDUC 291: Standards and Technology (0 Cr)

In this course students learn about effectively integrating technology into classroom instruction. This course meets for three evening sessions in a computer laboratory setting. Students are required to take this course concurrently with EDUC 330. P/N only. Offered each semester.

EDUC 294: Academic Internship

EDUC 298: Independent Study

EDUC 321: Teaching of Reading, 5-12 (0.50)

This course provides a theoretical and practical foundation for assisting secondary readers. Students learn the essentials of good reading instruction and apply them in the development of a literature unit. Required 10-hour field experience. Offered annually in the first-half of the spring semester. Counts toward linguistic studies concentration.
Prerequisites: EDUC 290 and EDUC 330, or permission of instructor.

EDUC 330: Principles of Education, K-12

This course is designed to assist students in developing their own teacher style as they prepare to become full-time teachers. Topics include the roles and responsibilities of teachers, methods of instruction, planning, classroom management, assessment and reporting and other current educational issues. Through micro-teaching and school-based field experiences, they also practice instructional skills and techniques. Required 20-hour field experience. Offered each semester.
Prerequisite: EDUC 290 and acceptance into the teacher education program.

EDUC 334: Social Studies Perspectives

This course examines basic assumptions about social science, primal thought, feminism, humanities, history, post-modernism, and thematic social studies. Students pursue methodologies of structuring knowledge and means of advancing knowledge in each discipline. Students learn how to relate their social studies subject matter to the total social studies curriculum. Offered annually in the spring semester.
Prerequisite: EDUC 260 or EDUC 290 or permission of instructor.

EDUC 341: Teaching of Visual Art, K-12

This course provides practical information specifically relevant to the field of visual arts and art education. Students learn basic concepts about child growth, developmental stages, learning styles, and varied classroom approaches. They participate in classroom observations and practical applications of classroom activities, prepare units of instruction, and microteach. Topics include arts advocacy, interdisciplinary instruction, assessment, and teaching art history. Required field experience component. Offered periodically in the spring semester.
Prerequisite: EDUC 330.

EDUC 345: Teaching of Communication Arts/Literature, 5-12

This course prepares pre-service communication arts/literature teachers to share their love of the English language with secondary students. Attention is given to the theory and techniques of teaching writing, literature, reading, speech, listening, and media literacy. In addition, students explore topics including multicultural literature, adolescent literature, responding to and evaluating writing, unit planning in the language arts, and the Common Core State Standards for Literacy. Required field experience component. Offered annually in the spring semester. Counts toward linguistic studies concentration.
Prerequisite: EDUC 330.

EDUC 347: Teaching ESL, K-12

The course includes strategies and materials for teaching English to speakers of other languages. Students learn strategies that focus on the development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in English language learners. Students review materials appropriate for non-native English speakers and create their own materials and lesson plans. Fulfills EDUC 382: HumanRelations requirement. Required field experience component. Offered annually during Interim. Counts toward linguistic studies concentration.
Prerequisites: EDUC 246 and EDUC 330.

EDUC 348: Assessment of ESL, K-12

This course provides students with theoretical and practical knowledge about assessing the language proficiency of English Language Learners. Students learn how to construct and administer appropriate and non-discriminatory assessment and evaluation tools. Students administer several assessments and write a formal report. Required field experience component. Offered annually in the spring semester. Counts toward linguistic studies concentration.
Prerequisite: EDUC 330.

EDUC 349: Teaching of Latin, K-12

This course introduces students to teaching Latin in grades K-12. Theories, methods, issues, and trends are examined. Other topics include curriculum development and textbook, computer and audio visual resources. Offered upon demand. Arranged with Classics and Education chairs and the Latin instructor. Required field experience component. Offered periodically.
Prerequisite: EDUC 330.

EDUC 350: Teaching of Mathematics, 5-12

Students act as a "community of scholars" to examine current issues and trends in mathematics education. They learn strategies for engaging pupils in active mathematical investigation, using appropriate technology and other mathematical tools and for emphasizing communication, problem solving, reasoning and mathematical connections in their teaching. Includes reliance on the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics Standards documents. Required field experience component. Offered annually in the spring semester.
Prerequisite: EDUC 330.

EDUC 353: Teaching of World Languages, K-12

This course provides the basic professional knowledge and skills needed for successful entry into the field of modern language teaching. Through readings, class discussions, and active participation in teaching situations, students become familiar with both the theory and the practice of language teaching and are introduced to the issues faced by the profession at large in the beginning of the 21st century. Required field experience component. Offered annually in the fall semester. Counts toward linguistic studies concentration.
Prerequisite: EDUC 330.

EDUC 355: Teaching of Music in the Elementary School

The goal of the course is to acquire the knowledge, skills, and understandings necessary to develop, implement and assess a K-5 general music program. The course emphasizes current approaches such as those of Orff, Dalcroze and Kodaly as well as intercultural and interdisciplinary learning. Optional field experience component. Offered annually in the spring semester.
Prerequisite: EDUC 330.

EDUC 356: Teaching of Music in the Middle and High School (0.50)

The goal of the course is to acquire the knowledge, skills, and understandings necessary to develop, implement and assess a general music program for grades 5-12. Required field experience component. Offered annually in the first-half of the fall semester.
Prerequisite: EDUC 330 and EDUC 355.

EDUC 358: Teaching of Vocal Music in the Secondary School (0.50)

This course focuses on the many aspects involved in coordinating and teaching a secondary choral program. It includes discussions on extra-curricular activities, grading and record keeping, curriculum, repertoire and program planning, professional development, and other pertinent and related topics. Students gain practical knowledge and skills necessary to successfully manage a vocal music program. Offered annually in the fall semester.
Prerequisite: EDUC 330.

EDUC 359: Teaching of Instrumental Music (0.50)

Prospective band and orchestra teachers study the skills and knowledge necessary for successfully conducting instrumental music. The course includes teaching philosophy and strategies, repertoire and program planning, budgeting and scheduling, musical materials and scoring, recruiting and evaluation and specialized topics such as jazz ensemble and marching band. Offered annually in the fall semester.
Prerequisite: EDUC 330.

EDUC 364: Teaching of Science, 5-12

Prospective science teachers learn strategies for the practical application of learning theory to secondary school science classrooms. Topics include: the national science standards movement and No Child Left Behind; inquiry learning in the science classroom; lesson planning; teaching in the classroom and in the laboratory; technology: managing a science laboratory: and continuing professional development. Required field experience component. Offered annually in the spring semester.
Prerequisite: EDUC 330.

EDUC 365: Teaching of Social Studies, 5-12

Students acquire the skills, knowledge and attitudes to become successful teachers in the secondary social studies classroom. They use the curriculum standards of the National Council for Social Studies and those identified by the State of Minnesota to develop goals, outcomes, and assessments for the various content areas. Students acquire the knowledge, skills, and understandings necessary to address appropriate skills development in 5-12 social studies classrooms. Required field experience component. Offered annually in the spring semester.
Prerequisite: EDUC 330.

EDUC 367: Teaching of Theater, K-12

This course provides basic professional knowledge and skills needed for successful entry into the field of theatre education. Through readings, class discussions, and active participation in teaching situations (including microteaching), students become familiar with the theory and practice of teaching theatre K-12. Students learn about issues faced by the profession and how to manage a theatre production program. Required field experience component. Offered periodically in the spring semester.
Prerequisite: EDUC 330.

EDUC 372: Counseling and Communication in Schools (0.50)

Prospective teachers learn strategies to use when communicating with students who are experiencing personal difficulties. Communication with parents, family members and other professionals who have a vested interest in the student's well-being is emphasized. Professional ethics and liability are major components of the course. The course uses role playing to help students develop communication expertise. Topics include confidentiality, professional liability and boundaries, crisis intervention, abuse and neglect, mental health, and reporting and making referrals. Recommended junior year. Offered each semester.
Prerequisite: EDUC 260, EDUC 290, or permission of instructor.

EDUC 374: Reading in the Content Area (0.50)

This course focuses on evidence-based best practices in reading instruction that can be used across the curriculum by secondary teachers. Students acquire the necessary knowledge, skills, and strategies to teach reading in the teaching candidate's content area(s).Required 10-hour field experience. Offered each semester.
Prerequisite: EDUC 330 or permission of the instructor.

EDUC 375: Differentiated Instruction for Exceptional Learners (0.50)

Future teachers identify and acquire skills to serve exceptional students more effectively in the regular classroom. Students read and discuss to expand their knowledge of the broad spectrum of resources available for students with disabilities, second language learners, and those labeled "at-risk." Historical perspectives as well as inclusion, collaboration, curriculum development, and other current topics are included. Offered each semester.
Prerequisite: EDUC 290 or permission of instructor.

EDUC 378: Multicultural Education in Hawaii: Seminar and Practicum (off-campus)

Students examine the influence of race, class and multiculturalism in American schools by participating as teachers' assistants and tutors in two distinctly different K-12 schools. Students discover the challenges and benefits associated with teaching in a diverse racial, cultural and socio-economic environments. Through guest lectures, readings, field trips and seminars, students learn about the truly unique geographic and cultural setting of the Hawaiian islands. This environment makes an excellent framework to examine diversity on the mainland. Fulfills EDUC 382: Human Relations requirement. P/N only. Offered alternate Interims. Counts toward race and ethnic studies and American studies majors and race and ethnic studies concentration.
Prerequisite: EDUC 260 and EDUC 290, or EDUC 330.

EDUC 379: Urban Education Practicum and Seminar (off-campus)

This program provides an opportunity for students to gain direct teaching experience by serving as an intern/paraprofessional for a teacher in a Minneapolis/St. Paul public school. The Interim will heighten students' sensitivities to the complexities of multicultural, urban education and provide exposure to models used to foster educational and personal success in diverse student populations. On/off-campus orientation will be followed by four weeks of full-time work in a classroom with a host teacher and participation in weekly seminars with the college instructor. Reading assignments, journals, and guest speakers will complement the experience. Fulfills EDUC 382: Human Relations requirement. P/N only. Apply through Education Department by Oct.15. Offered during Interim. Counts toward race and ethnic studies major and concentration and American studies major.
Prerequisites: EDUC 330 or permission of instructor.

EDUC 381: Senior Seminar (0.50)

Offered concurrently with student teaching, this course meets during and after student teaching. It focuses on professional development, including personal philosophies of teaching/education, professional ethics, and portfolio development. Seminar sessions also address specific issues pertaining to the student teacher experience including classroom management, differentiated instruction, assessment, and planning. Student teachers only. Offered each semester.

EDUC 382: Human Relations (0 Cr)

All candidates must have a multicultural field experience to help develop their competence in teaching in multicultural environments. A minimum of 80 hours of field experience in a multicultural school environment (an Interim or its equivalent) is required prior to student teaching. All field experiences must be pre-approved. Below is a summary of options: EDUC 347: Teaching English as a Second Language; EDUC 378: Multicultural Education in Hawaii; EDUC 379: Urban Education Seminar and Practicum; or pre-approved internships in multicultural schools. See Education Department faculty and website for advice and information. EDUC 382 is not a course. Rather it is a recording mechanism indicating St. Olaf students who have completed their multicultural education requirement. Students register for EDUC 382 during their professional semester. P/N only. Offered each semester.

EDUC 385: Issues in Education (0.50)

In this reflective capstone course, teacher candidates reflect upon the influences that technology, cultural diversity, personal health, and chemical abuse have upon schooling, home life, community stability, and, ultimately, their own students' achievement. Student teachers examine school governance and administration, finance, contemporary issues, and employment preparation. Students build upon student teaching to determine the essential knowledge and skills of educators as change agents and their future roles as first-year teachers. Student teachers only. Offered each semester.

EDUC 389: Student Teaching (3.0)

Students are assigned to a full-time internship in schools under the guidance of a competent cooperating teacher and supervised by faculty from both the content area department and the Education Department. Student teaching provides the best possible introduction to the teaching experience. Student teachers practice all classroom teaching skills required to assure competency to begin their first-year of teaching. Minimum of 14 full-time weeks teaching, including orientation sessions and required seminars. Only student teachers may enroll: seniors or college graduates. Offered each semester.

EDUC 391: Student Teaching: Additional License (0.50)

Student teaching provides the best possible introduction to the teaching experience. Student teachers practice all classroom teaching skills required to assure competency to begin their first year of teaching. Students are assigned to a full-time internship in schools under the guidance of a competent cooperating teacher and supervised by faculty from both the content area department and the Education Department. Minimum of 6-12 full-time weeks teaching. Only student teachers may enroll: seniors or college graduates seeking an additional license. Offered each semester and during Interim. Cannot be taken concurrently with EDUC 389.
Prerequisite: completion of EDUC 389 or equivalent.

EDUC 394: Academic Internship

EDUC 396: Directed Undergraduate Research

This course provides a comprehensive research opportunity, including an introduction to relevant background material, technical instruction, identification of a meaningful project, and data collection. The topic is determined by the faculty member in charge of the course and may relate to his/her research interests. Offered based on department decision. May be offered as a 1.00 credit course or .50 credit course.
Prerequisite: determined by individual instructor.

EDUC 398: Independent Research

Chair, 2016-2017

Elizabeth A. Leer

Associate Professor of Education

English education; reading; curriculum and instruction

Linda M. Berger

Professor of Music

vocal and instrumental music education

Kimberly S. Briske

Adjunct Assistant Professor of Education

technology education

Heather Campbell

Associate Professor of Education

ESL; reading; special education; Director of Assessment

Kris A. Cropsey

Instructor in Romance Languages - Spanish

Hispanic linguistics; sociolinguistics; second language acquisition; teacher education

Karna E. Hauck

Instructor in Education

visual art

Sharon J. Lane-Getaz

Associate Professor of Mathematics, Statistics, and Computer Science and Education

statistics; statistics education

Nancy A. Lee

Instructor in Education

music education

Ryota Matsuura (on leave Interim and spring)

Associate Professor of Mathematics, Statistics, and Computer Science

mathematics education; algebraic number theory

Robert W. McClure

Associate Professor of Education

social studies; educational psychology; curriculum and instruction

Emily K. Mohl

Assistant Professor of Biology and Education

evolutionary ecology; plant-insect interactions; science education

Robert W. Ouren

Instructor in Music and Education

instrumental music education

Rosemary A. Pfarr-Baker

Instructor in Education

counseling; educational opportunity; Director of Field Experience and Licensure

Sarah B. Shippy

Instructor in Education

chemical awareness

Sarah E. Swan McDonald

Instructor in Education

social studies

Anthony M. Taylor

Instructor in Education

social studies

Jill A. Watson

Assistant Professor of Education

ESL; SLIFE education

Howard G. Wilson

Visiting Assistant Professor of Education

theater education