Women's and Gender Studies

Deb Clark, Tomson 283
507-783-3907

wp.stolaf.edu/womens-gender-studies

Women’s and gender studies students explore scholarship about women and gender across cultures and throughout history to examine intersections of gender, race, class, sexual orientation, nationality, ability, religion, and age. The program fosters critical thinking skills that encourage students to become active and ethical participants in career, family, social life, and community.

Overview of the Major and Concentration

Majors and concentrators take a range of courses across the curriculum, as well as in the women’s and gender studies program. Students explore the new scholarship about gender and gain an understanding of a variety of gender experiences across cultures and throughout history.

Distinction

See Academic Honors

Distinction in women's and gender studies must represent in some tangible way the culmination of interdisciplinary and/or theoretical work in the program. Distinction guidelines are posted on the program web site.

Requirements for the Major

A major in women's and gender studies consists of nine credits:

WMGST 121Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies1.00
WMGST 399Advanced Topics in Women's and Gender Studies (to be taken in the spring of the senior year)1.00
Seven additional courses, with the following criteria:7.00
One must be at level III
One course must focus on women's lived experiences
One course from each of the following areas:
1. Theory and methods applicable to studying gender
2. Gender in historical contexts
3. Gender in global, comparative, or diverse contexts
Total Credits9

No more than two courses from other institutions may count toward the major. A list of approved courses is posted on the program web site.

In consultation with the instructor and the program director, majors may count one course not designated as an approved women’s and gender studies course. This process requires a completed contract..

Majors who entered St. Olaf College before the fall of 2012 may opt to follow the requirements for the women's studies major, which are:

WMGST 121Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies1.00
WMGST 399Advanced Topics in Women's and Gender Studies (to be taken in the spring of the senior year) 11.00
Seven additional courses, with the following criteria:7.00
One must be level III
At least one course from each of the following areas:
1. Social or natural sciences
2. Literature, languages, or the arts
3. Religious, historical, or philosophical traditions
Total Credits9

No more than two courses taken elsewhere may count toward the major.

Requirements for the Concentration

Many students enhance their work in a major through an interdisciplinary focus on women and gender. A concentration in women’s and gender studies consists of:

WMGST 121Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies1.00
Four additional courses, three of which must be at level II or III, and they must be drawn from at least three departments4.00
Total Credits5

In consultation with the instructor and the program director, concentrators may count one course not designated as an approved women’s and gender studies course. Students who apply partial-credit courses toward the concentration must still complete the minimum number of required credits. No more than one course taken elsewhere may be counted toward the concentration.

WMGST 121: Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies

Required for the women's and gender studies major and concentration, this course introduces students to the concept of gender as a category of analysis. It is designed for students who seek a fuller understanding of themselves as women and men and a wider knowledge of the experiences and achievements of women. Offered each semester. Counts toward American studies major and educational studies concentration.

WMGST 294: Academic Internship

WMGST 298: Independent Study

WMGST 394: Academic Internship

WMGST 396: Directed Undergraduate Research

This course provides a comprehensive research opportunity, including an introduction to relevant background material, technical instruction, identification of a meaningful project, and data collection. The topic is determined by the faculty member in charge of the course and may relate to his/her research interests. Offered based on department decision. May be offered as a 1.00 credit course or .50 credit course.
Prerequisite: determined by individual instructor.

WMGST 398: Independent Research

WMGST 399: Advanced Topics in Women's and Gender Studies

The course provides a capstone to the major. Taught as a seminar, it offers an opportunity for students to integrate their studies of women and gender across disciplines and to become more aware of the intricate web of gender, race, culture, and class that informs women's experiences. Offered annually in the spring semester.
Prerequisite: WMGST 121.

Approved Courses

Topics courses are acceptable only if the topic is approved. Other courses not included in this list may be approved through a contract. Contract for course credit forms are available on the program website.

Theory and Methods Courses

AMST 100 American Culture: Interdisciplinary Perspectives

ART 277 Gender and Visual Culture

ENGL 242 Children's and Young Adult Literature

ENGL 264 Topics in Gender and Literature

ENGL 340 Advanced Studies in Literary Eras: American

FAMST 242 Family Relationships

FAMST 253 Human Sexuality

HIST 320 Seminar: Modern Europe (when the topic is Race, Gender, and Medicine)

PHIL 245 Philosophy and Feminism

PSYCH 390 Issues in Psychology

PSYCH 396 Directed Undergraduate Research (when the topic is Relationships or Gender and Emotions)

REL 209 Introduction to Feminist Theology

REL 344 Feminist Perspectives and Christian Ethics

SOAN 235 Introduction to Islamic Feminisms

SOAN 246 LGBTQA Lives and Issues

SOAN 260 Marriage and the Family

Women and Gender in Global, Comparative, or Diverse Contexts

FREN 372 Topics in Francophone Studies (when the topic is Women and Identity in Literature of the Maghreb)

HIST 121 The Making of Modern Russia

HIST 189 Topical Seminar (when the topic is Women in African Colonial History)

HIST 191 Europe from the Reformation to Modern Times (when given approval by director of women's and gender studies)

HIST 224 Modern Germany

HIST 231 20th-Century Russia

HIST 237 Gender in Medieval Europe

HIST 320 Seminar: Modern Europe (when the topic is Nation and Empire in Russian History)

PHIL 245 Philosophy and Feminism

PSYCH 223 Exploring India: Human Development in Cross-Cultural Context (abroad)

PSYCH 241 Developmental Psychology

REL 209 Introduction to Feminist Theology

REL 264 Theology and Sexuality

SOAN 128 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

SOAN 235 Introduction to Islamic Feminisms

SOAN 261 Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspective

SPAN 250 Gateway to the Spanish-Speaking World

Women and Gender in Historical Contexts

DANCE 246 Dance in the United States

ENGL 246 Women's Literature

ENGL 340 Advanced Studies in Literary Eras: American (when the topic is Money and American Literature or Sex, Madness, and Marriage)

FAMST 253 Human Sexuality

HIST 122 Europe and the Great War

HIST 182 America Since 1945

HIST 189 Topical Seminar (when the topic is Women in African Colonial History)

HIST 272 Women in America

HIST 320 Seminar: Modern Europe (when the topic is Race, Gender and Medicine)

REL 209 Introduction to Feminist Theology

REL 264 Theology and Sexuality

SOAN 246 LGBTQA Lives and Issues

Elective Courses

BIO 124 The Biology of Women

NORW 282 Ibsen

PSYCH 350 Parenting and Child Development in Diverse Families

Director, 2016-2017

Anna K. Kuxhausen

Associate Professor of History

Russian history; women's history

Ibtesam âl-Atiyat

Associate Professor of Sociology/Anthropology

Arab society; gender; social movements; Islamic movements

Jolene M. Barjasteh

Associate Professor of Romance Languages - French

19th- and 20th-century French literature; autobiography

Gwendolyn Barnes-Karol (on leave)

Professor of Romance Languages - Spanish

Peninsular literature and culture; contemporary Spain; orality and literacy; second language acquisition

Patricia Z. Beckman

Assistant Professor of Religion

Christian mysticism; history of Christianity; women and religions

David Booth

Associate Professor of Religion

history of theology; philosophy and psychology of religion; feminist theology; theology and sexuality

Lisa M. Bowers (on leave fall)

Assistant Professor of Biology

microbiology; genetics; molecular biology; synthetic biology

Maggie A. Broner

Associate Professor of Romance Languages - Spanish

Hispanic linguistics; culture; second language acquisition

J. Laurel Carrington

Professor of History

medieval; Renaissance and Reformation history

Sylvia G. Carullo

Professor of Romance Languages - Spanish

Spanish-American literature; colonial 20th century Spanish-American literature; Afro-Hispanic literature; Hispanic-American literature; art and literature-female portraits in Spanish-American literature

Grace E. Cho

Associate Professor of Psychology

developmental psychology; child development; cultural psychology; socioemotional development; parent-child processes

Karen L. Gervais

Adjunct Professor of Philosophy

bioethics; philosophy of law; social and political philosophy; feminist philsophy; public health ethics

Dana L. Gross

Professor of Psychology, Associate Dean of Interdisciplinary and General Studies

developmental psychology; off-campus study

Carol Holly (on leave fall)

Professor of English

American literature, including autobiography and memoir; fiction; women's literature

Judy Kutulas

Professor of History

20th-century U.S. history; U.S. women's history; popular and material culture

Diane C. LeBlanc

Professor of Interdisciplinary Studies and Director of the Writing Program

rhetoric and composition; creative writing; gender studies

Leon Narvaez

Professor of Romance Languages - Spanish

Hispanic culture, language, and literature; migration and other interdisciplinary studies

Jonathan P. O'Conner

Assistant Professor of Romance Languages-Spanish

Peninsular early modern/golden age literature and cultures; cultural and intellectual histories; humanism; colonial Latin America

Dolores Peters

Associate Professor of History

modern France; modern Europe; history of medicine

Diana Postlethwaite (on leave fall)

Professor of English

19th-century British literature; the novel

Rebecca S. Richards

Assistant Professor of English

rhetoric and composition; feminist/gender studies; media studies

Jamie A. Schillinger

Associate Professor of Religion

Christian thought and ethics; Islamic thought and ethics

Susan E. Smalling

Associate Professor of Social Work and Family Studies

anti-oppressive research and practice; indigenous populations; family and child welfare

Ariel T. Strichartz

Associate Professor of Romance Languages - Spanish

contemporary Latin American theater and narrative; Argentine theater; literary food studies; memory studies

Charles A. Wilson (on leave)

Professor of Religion

theology