Art and Art History

Patty Cohn, Dittmann 200
507-786-3248

wp.stolaf.edu/art

The Department of Art and Art History at St. Olaf approaches the study of art as an intellectual and creative endeavor. The department's curriculum provides students with the research, interpretive, and technical skills to make and study meaningful works of art and to sustain them as artists and critical thinkers throughout their lives. In keeping with the larger mission of St. Olaf, art and art history faculty strive to teach students to make connections between cultures and across academic disciplines, and to work creatively with a broad range of media and critical models. The Flaten Art Museum is integral to the curriculum with its on-going exhibition program and its permanent collection. Through the resources provided by the studio, classroom, and museum, art and art history students learn to question, investigate, and explore art in order to gain an understanding of its transformative power in the world and in their own lives.

Intended Learning Outcomes for the Studio Art Major

Intended Learning Outcomes for the Art History Major

Distinction

Information about the criteria considered in conferring distinction is available in the Department of Art and Art History.  See Academic Honors.

Visual Arts Education Teaching License

St. Olaf offers a K-12 teaching license in studio art. See the Education Department's website for more information about licensure programs.

Off-campus Study

Many students arrange for part of the coursework for their major to be completed in London, Florence, Rome, New York City, Washington, D.C., Chicago, or Minneapolis, among other locations. Internship opportunities are possible in specialized fields of study that involve students in the workaday professional art world. Both art history and studio students can take advantage of the Minneapolis Institute of Arts, the Walker Art Center, and other Minneapolis-St. Paul art institutions. Studio majors also can gain professional experience in the Twin Cites in graphic design, illustration, architecture, and other areas.

Recommendations for Graduate or Professional Study

Studio Art

Students interested in studio-related careers or study are strongly encouraged to complete extensive coursework in the medium or discipline of their choice and to develop a strong portfolio. Also recommended is participation in special programs incorporating advanced work, such as internships or one-semester study at cooperating art schools. A unique fifth-year program for emerging artists offered by the Department of Art and Art History provides studio space to a limited number of exceptional art student applicants who wish to spend the year after graduation concentrating on building a strong portfolio in preparation for graduate studies.

Art History

The prospective graduate student, following the completion of ART 153 Introduction to Art History, should take at least one course each in medieval, Renaissance, modern, and a non-Western area of art. The student should also take a second course in a specific area of interest and language and culture courses related to that area. Those interested in the museum professions should also seek an internship and courses about museums, collecting, and display taught in other programs (e.g., management studies, sociology/anthropology, etc.). ART 350 The Methods of Art History is taught as a seminar with student presentations and discussions patterned on typical graduate school offerings. The department reserves the right to retain student work for its file.

Requirements for a Studio Art Major

Students majoring in studio art must earn a minimum of ten credits.

ART 102Foundation Two-Dimensional Media (Art 106: Drawing from Nature in the Bahamas can be taken instead of Art 102) 11.00
ART 103Foundation Three-Dimensional Media 11.00
ART 104Foundation New Media 11.00
ART 343Senior Studies in Studio Art1.00
Select an elective1.00
Select two art history courses 22.00
Select one level II course from each of three different areas. (See course listings by areas below.)3.00
1

Foundation courses may be taken in any order.

2

The department strongly recommends ART 252 or ART 253 as one of the art history courses taken.

Level II Course Areas

Two-Dimensional Media

Drawing
ART 225Architectural Design I1.00
ART 232Figure Drawing1.00
ART 233Advanced Two-Dimensional Studio1.00
Painting
ART 221Oil/Acrylic Painting1.00
ART 222Water-Based Media1.00
Printmaking
ART 226Printmaking: Relief and Lithography1.00
ART 227Printmaking: Intaglio and Monoprints1.00
Graphic Design
ART 236Graphic Design 11.00

 Three-Dimensional Media

Ceramics
ART 207Ceramics1.00
ART 234Intermediate Ceramics1.00
Sculpture
ART 223Sculpture/Metal Casting1.00
ART 224Sculpture/Direct Metal1.00

 New Media

Photography
ART 205Photography1.00
ART 238Intermediate Photography1.00
Interactive Image
ART 228Animated Art1.00
Digital Video
ART 229Digital Filmmaking1.00
Performance
ART 240Topics in the Fine Arts1.00
Graphic Design
ART 236Graphic Design 11.00
1

 2D or 4D, depending on instructor

Majors must participate in the annual juried show. To fulfill the requirements of the studio art major and studio art education licensure, each student must enter at least two juried art exhibitions on- or off-campus by the beginning of their senior year. Students unable to meet this requirement must speak with their advisor or the department chair.

Requirements for an Art History Major

Members of the classes of 2018 and 2019 declaring an art history major must earn nine credits as listed below. Members of the classes of 2016 and 2017 have the choice to fulfill these major requirements or those from the old major listed below.

ART 153Introduction to Art History 11.00
ART 350The Methods of Art History1.00
Select one course in studio art1.00
Select a minimum of six courses from the following. At least two courses must focus on Asian, African, or Indigenous American Art; at least two courses must focus on American or European art; one course must cover art created before 1700 CE; one must cover art created after 1700 CE. 26.00
Courses that focus on Asian and African art created before 1700CE
The Arts of China
The Arts of Japan
Sacred Sites of South Asia (abroad)
Buddhism through Text and Image
Courses that focus on Asian and African art created after 1700CE
African Art History
Visual Culture of Modern China
Courses that focus on European and American art created before 1700CE
Italian Renaissance Art
Italian Art in Context (abroad)
Medieval Art
Gothic Art
Religion, Royalty & Romantics: The Gothic and Gothic Revival
Courses that focus on European and American art created after 1700CE
Art 1776-1880, Revolutionary Art
Art 1880-1945 "The Shock of the New
Art Since 1945
Gender and Visual Culture
Art Now: Critical Issues in Contemporary Art
A History of Photography
Issues in Art Criticism
For the following courses, check with the Department Chair to see how the course's particular topic meets the major distribution requirements.
History of World Architecture
Topics in Art History
Independent Study
Directed Undergraduate Research
Independent Research
Approved courses in other departments. Occasionally, other departments offer courses not listed here that count for Art History. Check with the Department Chair for approval.
Nature and American Landscapes
Aesthetics
Majors must also successfully complete the non-credit, senior "lasting legacy" project or its equivalent.
Total Credits9
1

A student who has already taken the now discontinued Art 150 or 151 may substitute either one of them for ART 153

2

A maximum of two courses in art history taken in off-campus programs may, upon approval of the department, be applied to the major.

Requirements for an Art History Major in effect through April 2014

These major requirements are open only to students in the classes of 2016 and 2017. These students must earn nine credits as follows:

ART 150 11.00
ART 151 11.00
ART 350The Methods of Art History1.00
Select one course in studio art1.00
Select a minimum of five courses from the following. At least one courses must concentrate on European and/or North American art, and at least one course must concentrate on Asian, African, and/or Latin American art. 25.00
Course that concentrate on Asia, Africa, or Latin American Art
The Arts of China
The Arts of Japan
Sacred Sites of South Asia (abroad)
Visual Culture of Modern China
Buddhism through Text and Image
African Art History
Courses that concentrate on Europe and North America
Art 1776-1880, Revolutionary Art
Art 1880-1945 "The Shock of the New
Art Since 1945
Italian Renaissance Art
Italian Art in Context (abroad)
A History of Photography
Medieval Art
Gothic Art
Religion, Royalty & Romantics: The Gothic and Gothic Revival
Gender and Visual Culture
Art Now: Critical Issues in Contemporary Art
Issues in Art Criticism
For the following courses, check with the Department Chair to see how the course's particular topic meets the major distribution requirements.
History of World Architecture
Topics in Art History
Independent Study
Approved courses in other departments
Nature and American Landscapes
Aesthetics
Total Credits9
1

Consult with the chair of the Department of Art and Art History if you declared an art history major prior to April 2014 but have not taken both ART 150 and ART 151. 

2

A maximum of two courses in art history taken in off-campus programs may, upon approval of the department, be applied to the major.

Majors must also successfully complete the non-credit, senior "lasting legacy" project or its equivalent.

Requirements for a double major in Studio Art and Art History

Students who fulfill all core requirements for both studio art and art history major may choose to count up to 17 full credits in the Department of Art and Art History toward graduation when graduating with the normal 35 credits. (Therefore, 18, rather than the usual 21, courses would be required outside of  art/art history.)

Foundation Courses

Most advanced courses require the completion of one or more foundation courses.

ART 102: Foundation Two-Dimensional Media

This foundation-level studio course introduces the aesthetic, conceptual, and technical foundations of two-dimensional art-making and the ways drawing informs the creation and understanding of art in cultural contexts. Students explore color, value, form, and space through a wide variety of materials. The course emphasizes strategies for idea generation and visual problem solving. Students engage in spirited investigation, critiques, and thoughtful creative expression. Materials fee. Offered each semester.

ART 103: Foundation Three-Dimensional Media

This foundation-level studio course introduces the aesthetic, conceptual, and technical foundations of three-dimensional art-making and the ways three-dimensional media inform the creation and understanding of art in many contexts. Students explore sculpture and its intersection with other media and art forms through a variety of materials and experiments. The course emphasizes idea generation. Students engage in spirited investigation, creative expression, and play. Materials fee. Offered each semester.

ART 104: Foundation New Media

This foundation-level studio course introduces the aesthetic, conceptual, and technical foundations of new media art-making. Students explore creative approaches to digital, time-based, and interactive art processes; examples include digital photo-montage, 3D printing, video art, and web-based art. Idea generation and development is central to the course, with an emphasis on experimentation and divergent thinking. Students engage in dynamic activity, spirited investigation, and thoughtful creative expression. Materials fee. Offered each semester. Counts toward film studies and media studies concentrations.

ART 106: Drawing from Nature in the Bahamas (abroad)

San Salvador is a small Caribbean island boasting a great diversity of marine and terrestrial habitats. Students explore intersections between art and science as they develop basic drawing skills. Emphasis is placed on observation of the natural world. Lectures and field trips are coordinated with BIO 287: Island Biology. Apply through International and Off-Campus Studies. Offered during Interim in alternate years.
Prerequisite: must have at least sophomore standing.

Level II Studio Courses

ART 205: Photography

This course introduces students to analog and digital photographic processes as means for creating works of art. Students learn terminology and critical approaches to photography. The course includes presentations on concepts and photographers' works, discussions of articles, and regular critiques. Students are introduced to the history of the medium through presentations, readings, and hands-on work such as constructing a camera obscura. Students develop critical skills and the ability to analyze and interpret photographic work. Materials fee. Offered each semester. Counts toward media studies concentration.

ART 207: Ceramics

This course introduces students to the ceramic processes of wheel throwing and hand building as means for creating works of art. Students learn terminology and critical approaches to ceramics. Students develop critical skills and the ability to analyze and interpret ceramic art work. The course emphasizes creative approaches to solving visual problems through ceramic work. Slide presentations on contemporary and historical ceramics provide background for assignments and highlight the role of ceramics in various cultural contexts. Materials fee. Offered each semester.

ART 221: Oil/Acrylic Painting

This course develops and stimulates research into the emotional/expressive properties of painting. By investigating thematic, compositional, and technical problems, students develop a personalized approach to ideas and content. Students learn the importance of process, flexibility, alternatives, and the recognition that a painting has a life of its own. Materials fee. Offered annually.
Prerequisite: ART 102.

ART 222: Water-Based Media

This course explores the fundamental principles of design, color, and composition through water-based media. Through advanced techniques, strong drawing, and exploration of personal ideas, students develop a personal, expressive, and visual language. Students are encouraged to seek innovative solutions, take initiative, and celebrate creative risk-taking. Materials fee. Offered annually.
Prerequisite: ART 102.

ART 223: Sculpture/Metal Casting

This sculpture course introduces lost wax bronze casting, an art and industrial process that changed the course of human civilization. Students learn to cast, finish, and present cast metal work, building upon concepts from the foundation course and exploring the next level of sculpture topics, issues, and concerns. The course makes use of hands-on instruction, readings, slide talks, and discussion. Materials fee. Offered annually in the fall semester.

ART 224: Sculpture/Direct Metal

This sculpture course introduces students to metal forming, shaping, fastening and brazing, and welding, building upon concepts from the foundation course and presenting the next level of sculpture topics, issues and concerns. Both majors and non-majors discover an art and industrial process that has great artistic and practical application The course makes use of hands-on instruction, readings, slide talks, and discussion. Materials fee. Offered annually in the spring semester.

ART 225: Architectural Design I

Through a sequence of architectural design projects, students learn drawing (hand drafting and computer-aided drawing and design) and architectural design processes that require the integration of social, artistic, technical, and environmental issues typical of real projects. Visiting architects are involved. Field trips to experience spaces/places augment the studio work. Materials fee. Offered alternate years.
Prerequisite: ART 102 and ART 103 or permission of instructor.

ART 226: Printmaking: Relief and Lithography

Emphasizing individual concepts, personal expression and strong composition, this course explores relief and lithography. Using large-scale, multicolor moveable block, collograph, wood or lino block techniques and lithography stones or aluminum plates in both black and white and color. Students produce multiple images on one of the department's three presses. Students become familiar with the heritage of old masters as well as contemporary artists in printmaking. Materials fee. Offered annually.
Prerequisite: ART 102.

ART 227: Printmaking: Intaglio and Monoprints

This course provides a strong foundation in the array of copper plate processes of etching, aquatint, lift ground, soft ground, and polymer plate printmaking processes as wellas in painterly monoprinting techniques. Students address personal sources of ideas, experimentation, drawing skills and compositional concerns and draw upon examples of master printmakers to discuss how images reflect culture. Critical thinking skills are necessary in discussion and critiques. Materials fee. Offered annually.
Prerequisite: ART 102.

ART 228: Animated Art

This course focuses on the creative use of animation techniques. Students study the principles of animation and produce projects utlilizing a variety of techniques including flipbooks, stop motion photography, animated GIFs, and 2D and 3D computer-generated animation software. Students regularly screen, analyze, and discuss contemporary and historic animations. Materials fee. Offered alternate years. Counts toward film studies, management studies, and media studies concentrations.
Prerequisite: ART 104 or permission of the instructor.

ART 229: Digital Filmmaking

This course focuses on the creative use of digital video as a tool to generate experimental films and video art. Students study all aspects of production from concept to screening, including idea generation, pre-production planning, storyboarding, lighting, shooting, editing, and sound design. Students regularly screen, analyze, and discuss contemporary and historic examples of time-based media. During the semester students produce a variety of short videos and films, exploring experimental, narrative, and documentary approaches. Materials fee. Offered alternate years. Counts toward film studies and media studies concentrations.
Prerequisite: ART 104 or permission of instructor.

ART 232: Figure Drawing

Drawing the human form from life has been a mainstay in the training of artists since the Renaissance because of its unparalleled discipline in the training of the eye. Along with becoming better observers, students reach a personal understanding of the figure and an appreciation of its art-historical uses. Various media and techniques are explored as a means to understand the expressive possibilities of the figure.
Prerequisite: ART 102.

ART 233: Advanced Two-Dimensional Studio

This course, designed for students who want to heighten their two-dimensional skills, emphasizes using expressive qualities of art-making by investigating various media, techniques, and content. Assignments are both traditional and non-traditional, within historical and contemporary perspectives. Experimentation and development of a personal visual language are encouraged. The course culminates in the production of a series of works that relate thematically. Critical thinking and discussion skills are important. Offered annually. Materials fee.
Prerequisite: ART 102.

ART 234: Intermediate Ceramics

This intermediate-level course assumes students have a substantial understanding of ceramic processes, plus a good awareness of their own interests in the realm of ceramic expression. The instructor helps students focus their efforts by proposing specific areas of investigation. Materials fee. Offered annually.
Prerequisite: ART 207. Previous studio experience in ceramics is accepted when approved by the instructor.

ART 236: Graphic Design

This course introduces students to the medium of graphic design as a method of enhanced communication. The course explores the design communication process including conceptualization, creative processes, terminology, and technology. Assignments introduce computer applications used in the graphic design profession as well as graphic design elements of typography, production, color theory, digital printing processes, and basic web design. Counts toward studio art and art history majors and management studies and media studies concentrations.

ART 238: Intermediate Photography

In this intermediate photography course, students explore a variety of techniques and topics. Techniques include historic processes such as cyanotype and salted paper printing, digital photography, large-scale color printing, and traditional black and white photography. Students investigate experimental approaches and non-traditional forms for presentation, and they investigate photography from broad historical, aesthetic, and social perspectives. This course includes field trips, readings, discussion, and visual presentations. Materials fee. Offered annually. Counts toward media studies concentration.
Prerequisite: ART 104 or ART 205, or permission of instructor.

ART 240: Topics in the Fine Arts

The department periodically offers special topics courses. The specific title of the course is listed in the class and lab schedule when it is offered.

ART 246: New York Art Interim (off-campus)

This course provides intensive exposure to career opportunities in architecture, painting, sculpture, printmaking, ceramics, photography, illustration, video, digital media, and design of all kinds (from toys to exhibitions at the Metropolitan Museum of Art). Working five to seven hours a day, students interview over 25 artist professionals during the month, visit more than 100 galleries and museums, and write extensively about artists and artwork.This course does not count toward the major in studio art or art history. Offered during Interim in alternate years. Counts toward management studies concentration.
Prerequisite: none, but completion of the following courses is highly recommended: ART 253 (preferred), ART 252, and ART 280.

ART 294: Academic Internship

ART 298: Independent Study


Prerequisites: (for studio art) four foundation courses and two upper-division courses in area of study.
Prerequisites: (for art history) two upper-division courses in area of study.

Level III: Advanced Studio Courses

ART 340: Topics Seminar in Studio Art

This course enables the advanced studio art student to pursue further work in any chosen medium or combination of media including performance, installation, and collaborative ways of working. This course is organized around an interdisciplinary theme set each year by the instructor. Within a seminar format, students read, discuss, and write ontheselected topic in conjunction with topic-driven individual studiowork and critiques. Offered annually.
Prerequisites: three foundation studio courses plus a minimum of two level II studio courses.

ART 343: Senior Studies in Studio Art

This capstone course in the studio art program consists of advanced studio work, a visiting artist series, weekly critiques, and discussions with faculty and peers. Each student's independent work with a faculty advisor culminates in a senior exhibition at Flaten Art Museum. Weekly sessions also cover such topics as preparing a resume, documenting one's work, framing, and producing exhibition announcements and posters. Offered annually.
Prerequisites: (for non-studio majors) Art 102, ART 103, ART 104, two upper-level (200-300) courses, one art history course, and permission of chair.

ART 394: Academic Internship

ART 398: Independent Research


Prerequisites: (for studio art) four foundation courses and three courses in area of study.
Prerequisites: (for art history) three courses in area of study.

Art History Courses

All art history courses except Art 275, 280, 298, 350, 370 and 398 have no prerequisites and may be taken in any order.

ART 153: Introduction to Art History

This course introduces students to the working methods of Art History. Students learn to analyze works of art visually, to understand the relationships between works of art and their cultural contexts, to consider the practices and politics of museum display, and to think critically about the role of art in their own lives and in society. The theme of the course varies by instructor; see the department website for current offerings. Offered each semester.

ART 161: History of World Architecture

This course examines architectural monuments and their symbolic forms combined with evidence of earthly and divine concepts. From cave dwellings to geodesic domes, from Eastern to Western systems, students review sacred and profane structures from a variety of cultures. Each student investigates a living reality of space, function, and form found in human-built environments. Offered periodically.

ART 251: Art 1776-1880, Revolutionary Art

This lecture course surveys how art (mostly painting and sculpture) in Europe unfolded in remarkable ways relative to values signaled by the French Revolution. The course examines Neo-Classical art as it expresses Enlightenment thinking, the tumultuous Romantic and Realist imagery and times, and ends with Impressionism. Offered periodically during Interim. Open to first-year students.

ART 252: Art 1880-1945 "The Shock of the New

This course introduces modern industrial culture and thought through a study of painting, sculpture, architecture, and related arts. Students learn about the strikingly new modes of art created in Europe and the United States after 1880, examining work by Edvard Munch, Frank Lloyd Wright, Pablo Picasso, Hannah Höch, and many others. Offered annually.

ART 253: Art Since 1945

This course is an introduction to modern and postmodern art and thought after World War II through a survey of painting, sculpture, and new-media arts. Students learn about celebrated art and artists, major values such as issues of identity informing their work, and ways of analyzing and making sense of newer art. Offered annually. Counts toward American studies major.
Prerequisite: none, but at least one college art history or studio art course is recommended.

ART 254: Italian Renaissance Art

This course explores painting, sculpture, architecture, and urban development in Italy from c. 1300 to c. 1600. The course focuses on the major urban centers of the period: Florence, Rome, and Venice. Students address the ways in which art functioned in its original Renaissance context and explore issues of artistic identity and the importance of patronage in the period. Offered periodically.

ART 255: Italian Art in Context (abroad)

This course is an intensive introduction to the art and architecture of Italy. Students will experience Italy as a cultural crossroads including sites from a broad range of cultures and eras; including Punic, Greek, Roman, Byzantine, Arab, European and Norman influences. This cross-cultural experience will be the foundation for study of Florence from its inception as a Roman colony through the 19th century when Florence was the capital of the newly unified Italian nation. Offered during Interim in alternate years.

ART 256: A History of Photography

Since its invention, photography has shaped our ways of seeing, our social history, and our identities. Photography is also a compelling form of artistic expression. This course is an introduction to the history of photography from its origins to the present, including the role of photography in society and in the fine arts. Students learn the skills of formal visual analysis and critical thinking about the power of the photographic image in our lives. Offered periodically. Counts toward media studies and film studies concentrations.

ART 259: The Arts of China

This course is intended as an introduction to the history of Chinese art, offering a survey of major artistic developments from neolithic times to the present. Among the topics considered: ritual bronzes, funerary remains of the Qin and Han, Buddhist sculpture, and the evolution of landscape painting. Important issues discussed include production and patronage, function, and borrowing and influence in the evolution of artistic works across time and space. Offered annually.

ART 260: The Arts of Japan

This course introduces the history of Japanese art, offering a survey of major artistic developments from neolithic times to the present. Among the topics considered: funerary remains of the neolithic through Kofun eras; indigenous as well as imported religious traditions and their imagery, and the secular arts. Issues discussed include production and patronage, function, and borrowing and influence in the evolution of artistic works. Offered annually.

ART 262: Sacred Sites of South Asia (abroad)

This course examines art and architecture in a variety of sacred sites in India. Students investigate the development of traditional forms of architecture and imagery at Hindu, Buddhist, and Jain sites, the evolution of these forms within later constructed temple complexes, and the impact of Islam upon these earlier religious traditions. Students also explore Western involvement in the modern identities of sites and new approaches to sacred sites seen in 20th-century works. Offered during Interim in alternate years.

ART 263: Medieval Art

This course explores the arts and architecture of western Europe from c. 300 to c. 1300. Through lectures and discussions, students study paintings, sculpture, manuscripts, metalwork, and stained glass windows created by the many cultures of this rich and diverse period in the history of art. Students approach the material in a variety of ways; in addition to issues of style, technique, and iconography, students address issues of viewing, patronage, and gender. Offered periodically. Counts toward medieval studies major.

ART 269: African Art History

This course serves as an introductory survey of the diverse arts and cultures of sub-Saharan Africa. Students investigate material culture in its original context to understand the social roles that art plays in many aspects of life. Students also learn to identify and discuss styles, materials, techniques, and the roles of artists. Special topics considered may include: contemporary versus historical art in Africa, notions of "authenticity" and tourist art, cultural heritage and repatriation of art works, and the politics and history of museum display. Offered periodically. Counts toward Africa and the Americas concentration.

ASIAN 270: Visual Culture of Modern China

This course highlights major visual arts movements within China over the last century, from the end of the imperial era to current times. Students look at a variety of issues: class and gender; China in the world art market, Chinese art past and present, and a variety of "isms" now seen as defining Chinese art. A major theme is to define "visual culture" in all its nuances. Counts toward media studies concentration.

ART 271: Gothic Art

This course treats both the art created in the Gothic period in Western Europe (c. 1140-1400) and the revival of the Gothic style in 19th-century Europe. In the later medieval world, the course focuses on the rise of the city, on the spirituality of the Franciscan and Dominican orders, and on a new class of patrons who, fueled by the new economy of Europe, commissioned art on a larger scale than ever before. The course ends with a discussion of what the Gothic came to mean in the 19th century, as European nations solidified and industrialized. Offered periodically. Counts toward medieval studies major.

ART 273: Religion, Royalty & Romantics: The Gothic and Gothic Revival

Through the study of Gothic art and architecture in 12-14th-century Europe and in 19th-century Europe and America, students explore how cultures devise and give meaning to artistic styles. Students also investigate the origins of the term Gothic and its meanings in popular culture. This course is taught by a St. Olaf and a Carleton professor and is offered to students on both campuses. Class meetings alternate between campuses, and enrolled students receive transportation stipends. Offered periodically in the fall semester. Counts toward art history, medieval studies, and studio art majors.

ART 275: Topics in Art History

This seminar-style course focuses on a specific art-historical topic, and students learn how to pursue art-historical practice beyond the introductory level. Topics change with each offering. Offered periodically.
Prerequisite: at least one art history course or permission of the instructor.

ART 277: Gender and Visual Culture

This course explores the roles of women as creators, subjects, and patrons of art. It helps students lean about how gender permeates culture and art. Specific topics vary. Each topic introduces a time period and place that has revealed much about gender and visual culture. Students work seminar-style yet at an introductory level for those new to art history or women's studies. Offered periodically. Counts toward women's and gender studies and art and art history majors and women's and gender studies concentration.

ART 280: Art Now: Critical Issues in Contemporary Art

This course explores in depth the issues most crucial to artists working today in an increasingly globalized art scene. Students investigate the complexities of new media, new methods of production and exhibition, and theoretical models through readings and a required field trip to a contemporary art museum. Students analyze both journalistic criticism and theoretical texts, encompassing a wide variety of perspectives, and respond through short writing assignments and classroom discussion. Fee for field trip may be required. Offered alternate years.
Prerequisite: at least one art history or studio art course, or permission of the instructor.

ART 294: Academic Internship

ART 298: Independent Study


Prerequisites: (for studio art) four foundation courses and two upper-division courses in area of study.
Prerequisites: (for art history) two upper-division courses in area of study.

ASIAN 310: Buddhism through Text and Image

This course examines Buddhist images and their relationship to textual sources. Beginning with a close reading of Buddhist texts in translation, students study how Buddhist images and architecture derive from textual sources -- and often move beyond them. The course considers the interrelatedness of text and image in Buddhist practice. Attention is also paid to Western notions of Buddhism and the development of Buddhist art studies in the West.

ART 350: The Methods of Art History

This seminar explores methods by which art historians and curators analyze works of art. Students develop an advanced understanding of these methods by application of various methods to works of art, by examining historical factors surrounding principle movements in the study of art history and by engaging in lively class debates about them. Readings, discussions, and presentations culminate in an independent research project that allows each student to find his or her own place in the discipline.
Prerequisite: two upper-division courses in art history.

ART 370: Issues in Art Criticism

This course is for experienced studio and art history students and those interested in contemporary theory. Students directly encounter art and new theory, explore art criticism (in part through practicing it) and learn about ethics to help think about value judgments. Recommended for students contemplating art history or studio graduate work.
Prerequisite: completion of BTS-T and at least one studio and/or one art history course recommended.

ART 394: Academic Internship

ART 396: Directed Undergraduate Research

This course provides a comprehensive research opportunity, including an introduction to relevant background material, technical instruction, identification of a meaningful project, and data collection. The topic is determined by the faculty member in charge of the course and may relate to his/her research interests. Offered based on department decision. May be offered as a 1.00 credit course or .50 credit course.
Prerequisite: determined by individual instructor.

ART 398: Independent Research


Prerequisites: (for studio art) four foundation courses and three courses in area of study.
Prerequisites: (for art history) three courses in area of study.

Courses in Other Departments Approved for Art History Credit

ENVST 270 Nature and American Landscapes

PHIL 243 Aesthetics

Chair, 2016-2017

Nancy M. Thompson

Professor of Art and Art History

medieval art in Europe; medieval and early modern art in Italy; women’s and gender studies

Vice-Chair, 2016-2017

Irve W. Dell

Professor of Art and Art History

sculpture; performance; installation; public art

Paul S. Briggs

Assistant Professor of Art and Art History

Beth A. Dow

Visiting Assistant Professor of Art and Art History

Mary M. Griep

Professor of Art and Art History, Associate Dean of Fine Arts

drawing; design; painting

Karil J. Kucera

Associate Professor of Art and Art History and Asian Studies

Asian art history; text/image; sacred sites

Peter B.B. Nelson

Assistant Professor of Art and Art History

new media; photography

Margaret Ojala (on leave)

Professor of Art and Art History

photography

Matthew Rohn

Associate Professor of Art and Art History and Environmental Studies

19th-and 20th-century art; American culture; gender and multi-cultureal studies; social justice; visual ecocriticism

John Saurer

Associate Professor of Art and Art History

sculture; drawing; printmaking; installation

Christopher M. Tradowsky

Assistant Professor of Art and Art History

contemporary art; critial theory; African art; gender studies

Michon J. Weeks

Visiting Assistant Professor of Art and Art History

drawing; painting; design