Music

Cheryl Bristol, Hall of Music 245
507-786-3180

wp.stolaf.edu/music

Inspired by the conviction that music is a divine gift, the St. Olaf College Music Department devotes itself to the cultivation of this gift in the lives of its students and in the broader community. We dedicate ourselves to creating an educational experience that unites the artistic standards of a professional program with the intellectual rigors and academic breadth of the liberal arts in an environment of free, creative, and critical inquiry. Through music we affirm the college’s mission to foster the development of the whole person in mind, body, and spirit.

The Music Department offers extensive opportunities to explore, practice, and celebrate the musician’s art with an ongoing commitment to a distinctive ensemble program, excellent individualized instruction, and a comprehensive undergraduate music curriculum. We honor St. Olaf’s rich heritage spanning more than a century of international artistry and scholarship and will continue to cultivate a spirit of exploration and innovation, seeking and celebrating the transcendent and transforming power of music.

Degrees Offered

The Music Department offers Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) and Bachelor of Music (B.M.) degrees, which are accredited by the National Association of Schools of Music. St. Olaf students may also pursue the Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Music double-degree option.

Bachelor of Arts Degree in Music

This is a liberal arts degree, with approximately one-third of the course work in music.  The B.A. music major may lead to a wide range of career options in music and related fields such as performance, broadcasting, multimedia, arts administration, advertising, education, arts journalism, music librarianship, or music therapy.  Students may choose a general music major or may elect an emphasis in composition, musicology, or theory. 

Intended Learning Outcomes for the Major

Bachelor of Music Degree

This is a professional music degree with approximately two-thirds of the course work in music. Students may elect one of five majors:

Bachelor of Music in Performance

Graduates often continue with work in performance, preparing for careers as performers and teachers.  This major also serves as good preparation for graduate studies in fields like music therapy.  Piano and organ performance majors may also purse an emphasis in collaborative keyboard performance.

Intended Learning Outcomes for the Major

Bachelor of Music in Church Music

Graduates generally continue their studies in graduate school or move directly into parishes as church musicians.  Careers in conducting, college teaching, or the ministry are also served by this major.  Church Music-Organ majors may also pursue an emphasis in collaborative keyboard.

Intended Learning Outcomes for the Major

Bachelor of Music in Composition

Graduates generally continue their studies in graduate school, eventually moving toward careers in film music and other media, teaching, or conducting.

Intended Learning Outcomes for the Major

Bachelor of Music in Music Education

This professional degree prepares graduates for a career in teaching immediately after graduation.  Graduate study is an option as well.

Intended Learning Outcomes for the Major

Bachelor of Music with Elective Studies

Substantively integrated with professional music studies, students propose and complete an individualized program of study in a second discipline.  Admission to this individualized degree program is by a competitive proposal process.  Graduates pursue professional careers in music with substantive connections to an additional arts area, business, science, language and culture, or other sphere of expertise.

Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Music Double-Degree Program

This program engages students in professional study in music and study in the liberal arts, leading to both the Bachelor of Music and Bachelor of Arts degrees. Students pursuing the double-degree option may choose from five Bachelor of Music graduation majors (church music, composition, elective studies, music education, or performance) and any of the Bachelor of Arts graduation majors except music. Students must meet the application requirements for both the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Music degree programs. This program typically takes five years to complete. Students pursing this option should consult their advisor as early as possible. See worksheet for more information.

Admission to the Music Major

Students generally apply for entrance into the music major before enrolling but may also apply during the first year of studies at St. Olaf. A complete application for any music major (B.A. or B.M.) requires an audition on the principal instrument/voice, and screenings to test basic music knowledge and skills. Current St. Olaf students should contact the Music Department office by October 1 of their first year for more information. More information for prospective majors.

Admissions to Teacher Education Programs

Entrance applications for B.M. music education programs are most often processed in the second semester of the sophomore year. Interested students must be already-admitted music majors and are classified as B.A. general music majors until accepted into a teacher education degree program. More information.

Continuance

All students in B.M. and teacher education programs are reviewed for continuance. B.M. performance, church music, composition, and elective studies students are generally reviewed at the end of the third semester in the program. Teacher education students are generally reviewed in the fall semester of their junior year. A continuance review includes a juried recital performance, a review of music and overall academic progress, and a possible interview/conference. A student not approved for continuance in any program is no longer in that program. More information.

Keyboard Proficiency

All music majors must demonstrate keyboard proficiency at a level specified for the major/instrument, and it is recommended that students complete proficiency by the end of the sophomore year. Students may demonstrate proficiency through successful completion of piano classes, or by examination. More information

Music Ensembles

All full-time students are eligible to audition for membership in any of these musical ensembles. Participation in these ensembles fulfills ensemble graduation requirements for music majors.

Vocal Ensembles

St. Olaf Choir, Chapel Choir, St. Olaf Cantorei, Chamber Singers, Manitou Singers, Viking Chorus

Instrumental Ensembles

St. Olaf Band, Norseman Band, St. Olaf Orchestra, St. Olaf Philharmonia, Collegium Musicum, Jazz Ensembles, Handbell Choirs

Additional opportunities for ensemble performance include Collegiate Chorale, Clarinet Choir, Flute Choir, Horn Club, Percussion Ensemble, Trombone Choir, Tuba-Euphonium Ensemble, and Lars Skjervheim Spelemannslag. Participation in these ensembles does not fulfill graduation requirements for music majors.

Distinction

The Music Department does not offer departmental distinction.

S/U Policy: No required course in the major can be taken S/U.

Music majors who study off-campus may petition the chair of the department for approval of a maximum of two (2) courses, plus performance studies.  Independent study or research may count as one of these courses.

B.A. General Music Major (beginning fall 2017)

Worksheet

Admission to the Music Major

See Music Admissions and Scholarship Information

  • application
  • principal-instrument/voice audition repertoire
  • music knowledge and keyboard skills screening
Degree Requirements
General Education
Comprehensive Graduation Requirements (General Education) 1
Core Music Courses
MUSIC 114Musicianship: Tonality1
MUSIC 141Introduction to Musicology1
MUSIC 161Piano Class I (0.25) (minimum grade of B-) 20.25
MUSIC 162Piano Class II (0.25) (minimum grade of B-) 20.25
Select one of the following:1
Chromatic Musicianship and Form
Post-Tonal Musicianship
Select 2 courses from Level III music electives, including at least one upper-level musicology elective (MUSIC 34x)2
Select 3 additional courses from Level II or Level III music electives3
Performance Studies
6 semesters (0.25 each); 4 in the same instrument/voice.1.5
Official Ensemble Participation
4 semesters
Required Performances 3
2 solo performances on a St. Olaf Student Recital
Required Recital Attendance 4
10 recitals per semester on campus, with a minimum of 60
Total Credits10

B.A. with Composition Emphasis (beginning fall 2017)

Worksheet

Admission to the Music Major

See Music Admissions and Scholarship Information

  • application
  • principal-instrument/voice audition repertoire
  • music knowledge and keyboard skills screening
Additional Admissions Requirements
  • complete application
  • consult and register with composition faculty by end of junior year, preferably earlier
Degree Requirements
General Education
Comprehensive Graduation Requirements (General Education) 1
Core Music Courses
MUSIC 114Musicianship: Tonality1
MUSIC 141Introduction to Musicology1.00
MUSIC 161Piano Class I (0.25) (minimum grade of B-) 20.25
MUSIC 162Piano Class II (0.25) (minimum grade of B-) 20.25
MUSIC 212Chromatic Musicianship and Form1
MUSIC 214Post-Tonal Musicianship1
MUSIC 223Composition I1
Select 2 courses from Level III music electives, including at least one upper-level musicology elective (MUSIC 34x)2
Select 1 additional course from Level II or Level III music electives1
Performance Studies1.5
6 semesters (0.25 each); 4 in the same instrument/voice
Official Ensemble Participation
4 semesters
Required Performances 3
2 solo performances on a St. Olaf student recital
Required Recital Attendance 4
10 recitals per semester on campus, with a minimum of 60
Total Credits10
Composition Emphasis
MUSIC 225Music in the Electronic Medium1
MUSIC 324Composition II: Orchestration1
MUSPF 326 Composition Lesson: 4 semesters (0.25 each)1
Required Performances
2 composition performances, at least 1 in junior or senior year
Portfolio
With approval of the composition faculty, the student submits a portfolio of at least 3 compositions previously submitted for Level III composition courses to the Music Office by May 1 of the senior year.
Total Credits3

B.A. with Musicology Emphasis (beginning fall 2017)

Worksheet

Admission to the Music Major

See Music Admissions and Scholarship Information

  • application
  • principal-instrument/voice audition repertoire
  • music knowledge and keyboard skills screening
Additional Admissions Requirements
  • complete application
  • consult and register with a music history faculty member by end of junior year, preferably earlier
Degree Requirements
General Education
Comprehensive Graduation Requirements (General Education) 1
Core Music Courses
MUSIC 114Musicianship: Tonality1
MUSIC 141Introduction to Musicology1
MUSIC 161Piano Class I (0.25) (minimum grade of B-) 20.25
MUSIC 162Piano Class II (0.25) (minimum grade of B-) 20.25
MUSIC 212Chromatic Musicianship and Form1
MUSIC 214Post-Tonal Musicianship1
Select 1 course from 24x-level musicology electives
Select 2 courses from Level III music electives, including at least one upper-level musicology elective (MUSIC 34x)2
Select 1 additional course from Level II or Level III music electives1
Performance Studies
6 semesters (0.25 each); 4 in the same instrument/voice. 1.5
Official Ensemble Participation
4 semesters
Required Performances 3
Two solo performances on a St. Olaf Student Recital
Required Recital Attendance 4
10 recitals per semester on campus, with a minimum of 60
Total Credits9
Musicology Emphasis
Two additional 34x musicology courses2
Selection one of the following:1
Counterpoint
Analysis of Tonal Music
Analysis of Post-Tonal Music
An additional 34x musicology course
Required Portfolio:
With approval of the musicology faculty, the student submits a portfolio of at least 3 papers previously submitted for Level III musicology courses to the Music Office by May 1 of the senior year. One of these must be revised with faculty supervision to demonstrate the student's best work in musiciology.
Total Credits3

B.A. with Theory Emphasis (beginning fall 2017)

Worksheet

Admission to the Music Major

See Music Admissions and Scholarship Information

  • application
  • principal-instrument/voice audition repertoire
  • music knowledge and keyboard skills screening
Additional Admissions Requirements
  • complete application
  • consult and register with theory faculty by end of junior year, preferably earlier
Degree Requirements
General Education
Comprehensive Graduation Requirements (General Education) 1
Core Music Courses
MUSIC 114Musicianship: Tonality1
MUSIC 141Introduction to Musicology1
MUSIC 161Piano Class I (0.25) (minimum grade of B-) 20.25
MUSIC 162Piano Class II (0.25) (minimum grade of B-) 20.25
MUSIC 212Chromatic Musicianship and Form1
MUSIC 214Post-Tonal Musicianship1
Select 2 courses from Level III music electives, including at least one upper-level musicology elective (MUSIC 34x)2
Select 2 additional courses from Level II or Level III music electives2
Performance Studies Lessons1.5
6 semesters (0.25 each); 4 in the same instrument/voice
Official Ensemble Participation
4 semesters in an official ensemble
Required Performances 3
2 solo performances on a St. Olaf Student Recital
Required Recital Attendance 4
10 recitals per semester on campus, with a minimum of 60
Total Credits10
Theory Emphasis
MUSIC 312Counterpoint1.00
MUSIC 313Analysis of Tonal Music1.00
MUSIC 314Analysis of Post-Tonal Music1.00
Required Portfolio
With approval of the theory faculty, the student submits a portfolio of at least 3 papers previously submitted for Level III theory courses to the Music Office by May 1 of the senior year. One of these must be revised with faculty supervision to demonstrate the student's best workin music analysis.
Total Credits3

Bachelor of Music Degree

B.M. in Performance (beginning fall 2017)

Worksheets: Brass, Woodwind, PercussionOrgan; Piano; Strings; Voice

Admission to the Music Major

See Music Admissions and Scholarship Information

  • application
  • principal-instrument/voice audition repertoire
  • music knowledge and keyboard skills screening
Additional Entrance Requirements

See Music Major Entrance Information

  • academic/music review, possible interview/conference
Program Continuance

See Music Major Continuance Information

  • generally during third semester in the program
  • students not approved for continuance are no longer in the BM Performance program
Degree Requirements
General Education
Comprehensive graduation requirements for all BM degrees 1
Core Music Courses
MUSIC 114Musicianship: Tonality1
MUSIC 141Introduction to Musicology1.00
MUSIC 212Chromatic Musicianship and Form1
MUSIC 214Post-Tonal Musicianship1
MUSIC 237World Music1
MUSIC 251Conducting (0.50)0.5
Select 2 courses from Level III music electives, including at least one upper-level musicology elective (MUSIC 34x)2
Select 2 additional courses from Level II or Level III music electives (can include secondary performance studies)2
Performance Studies6
Once accepted into the B.M. Performance program, students must register for a minimum of 6 semesters of 1.0 credit lessons (4 at Level I, subsequent at Level II)
Required Performances 2
2 solo performances on a St. Olaf Student Recital (may include Entrance and Continuance)
Entrance examination
Continuance examination
Junior half recital
Senior full receital
Official Ensemble Participation
Every semester in an official ensemble
Required Recital Attendance 3
10 recitals per semester on campus, with a minimum of 60
S/U Policy
No required course in the major can be taken S/U
Total Credits15.5
Additional Music Courses for Voice
MUSIC 161Piano Class I (0.25) (minimum grade of B-) 10.25
MUSIC 162Piano Class II (0.25) (minimum grade of B-) 10.25
MUSIC 261Piano Class III (0.25) (minimum grade of B-) 10.25
MUSIC 262Piano Class IV (0.25) (minimum grade of B-) 10.25
MUSIC 263Lyric Diction I (0.25)0.25
MUSIC 264Lyric Diction II (0.25)0.25
MUSIC 281Vocal Solo Literature I (0.25)0.25
MUSIC 282Vocal Solo Literature II (0.25)0.25
MUSIC 291Vocal Development and Pedagogy0.25
MUSIC 292Vocal Pedagogy II0.25
Select one of the following:1.00
Advanced Acting For The Lyric Stage
Opera Creation Residency in the Schools: Civic Engagement
Opera Workshop
Select 0.5 additional course from Level II or Level III music electives (can include secondary performance studies). Please see note below regarding the possibility of 1.5 credits being required. 10.5
Required foreign languages:
Students are required to do two semesters of either French or German (or proficiency exam) plus two semesters of a second foreign language (or profiency exam)
Total Credits4
Additional Music Courses for Strings
MUSIC 161Piano Class I (0.25) (minimum grade of B-) 10.25
MUSIC 162Piano Class II (0.25) (minimum grade of B-) 10.25
MUSIC 261Piano Class III (0.25) (minimum grade of B-) 10.25
MUSIC 275Instrumental Chamber Music (0.25) (2 semesters at 0.25 each)0.50
MUSIC 295String Literature and Pedagogy (0.50)0.50
Select 2.25 additional courses from Level II or Level III music electives (can include secondary performance studies). Please see note below regarding the possibility of 2.5 credits being required.2.25
Total Credits4
Additional Music Courses for Piano
MUSIC 270Advanced Keyboard Skills (minimum grade of B-)0.25
MUSIC 283Piano Literature (0.50)0.5
MUSIC 293Keyboard Pedagogy (0.50)0.50
Select 2.75 additional courses from Level II or Level II music electives (can include secondary performance studies)2.75
Total Credits4
Additional Music Courses for Winds, Brass, Percussion
MUSIC 161Piano Class I (0.25) (minimum grade of B-) 10.25
MUSIC 162Piano Class II (0.25) (minimum grade of B-) 10.25
MUSIC 261Piano Class III (0.25) (minimum grade of B-) 10.25
MUSIC 275Instrumental Chamber Music (0.25) (2 semesters)0.5
MUSIC 298Independent Study (Pedagogy and Literature)1
Select 1.75 additional courses from Level II or Level II music electives (can include secondary performance studies). Please see note below regarding the possibility of 2.50 credits being required. 11.75
Total Credits4
Additional Music Courses for Organ
MUSIC 270Advanced Keyboard Skills (minimum grade of B-)0.25
MUSIC 293Keyboard Pedagogy (0.50)0.50
MUSIC 298Independent Study (Organ Literature)1
Select 2.25 additional courses from Level II or Level II music electives (can include secondary performance studies)2.25
Total Credits4

B.M. in Piano Performance or Organ Performance with Emphasis in Collaborative Keyboard 

Worksheet

This emphasis can be added only to a B.M. Performance major in organ or piano.

Additional Music Courses
MUSIC 275Instrumental Chamber Music (0.25) (2 semesters)0.5
MUSIC 281Vocal Solo Literature I (0.25)0.25
MUSIC 282Vocal Solo Literature II (0.25)0.25
MUSPF 106 Performance Studies: Collaborative Keyboard1.0
Select 1.0 credit from the following:1
Choral Conducting (0.50)
Instrumental Conducting (0.50)
Lyric Diction I (0.25)
Lyric Diction II (0.25)
Advanced Acting For The Lyric Stage
Opera Creation Residency in the Schools: Civic Engagement
Opera Workshop
Instrumental Chamber Music (0.25) (additional semesters)
MUSPF 106 Additional semester of collaborative keyboard performance study
Total Credits3

B.M. in Church Music - Choral (beginning fall 2017)

Worksheet

Admission to the Music Major

See Music Admissions and Scholarship Information

  • application
  • principal-instrument/voice audition repertoire
  • music knowledge and keyboard skills screening
Special Entrance Requirements

See Music Major Entrance Information

Students must already be enrolled at the college and may apply for entrance in first year, spring semester.

Entrance requirements:

  • complete application (due October 15, March 15)
  • vocal audition in a student recital
  • academic/music review, possible interview/conference
Program Continuance

See Music Major Continuance Information

  • generally during Junior year, fall semester
  • students not approved for continuance are no longer in the B.M. Church Music program
Degree Requirements
General Education
Comprehensive graduation requirements for all BM degrees 1
Core Music Courses
MUSIC 114Musicianship: Tonality1
MUSIC 141Introduction to Musicology1
MUSIC 212Chromatic Musicianship and Form1
MUSIC 214Post-Tonal Musicianship1
MUSIC 235Music in Christian Worship1
MUSIC 236Church Music Practicum0.50
MUSIC 237World Music1
MUSIC 251Conducting (0.50)0.5
MUSIC 252Choral Conducting (0.50)0.50
MUSIC 262Piano Class IV (0.25)0.25
MUSIC 263Lyric Diction I (0.25)0.25
MUSIC 264Lyric Diction II (0.25)0.25
MUSIC 287Choral Literature I (0.50)0.50
MUSIC 291Vocal Development and Pedagogy0.25
MUSIC 292Vocal Pedagogy II0.25
MUSIC 354Advanced Conducting (0.50)0.50
Select 2 courses from Level III electives, including at least one upper-level musicology elective (MUSIC 34x)2
Select 2 additional courses from Level II or Level III music electives2
EDUC 355Teaching of Music in the Elementary School1
Voice Performance Studies Lessons
6 semesters (0.50 credit following admission to the major)3
Keyboard Performance Studies Lessons
5 semesters in addition to MUSIC 262 (any combination of 0.25-credit piano lessons, organ lessons, or piano classes: MUSIC 161, MUSIC 162, MUSIC 261)1.25
Required Performances 2
2 solo performances on a St. Olaf Student Recital (may include Entrance/Continuance)
Entrance examination
Continuance examination
Junior or Senior Half Voice Recital
MUSPF 330 Capstone Performance Project/Conducting Lessons.5
Official Ensemble Participation
Every semester in an official choral ensemble
Required Recital Attendance 3
10 recitals per semester on campus, with a minimum of 60
Total Credits19.5

B.M. in Church Music -  Organ (beginning fall 2017)

Worksheet

Admission to the Music Major

See Music Admissions and Scholarship Information

  • application
  • principal-instrument/voice audition repertoire
  • music knowledge and keyboard skills screening
Special Entrance Requirements

See Music Major Entrance Information

Students may apply/audition and enroll at the time of matriculation, or they may apply during their first year to enter program.

Students already enrolled at St. Olaf:

  • complete application (due October 15, March 15)
  • organ audition in a student recital
  • academic/music review, possible interview/conference
Program Continuance

See See Music Major Continuance Information

  • generally during third semester in the program
  • students not approved for continuance are no longer in the BM Church Music program
Degree Requirements
General Education
Comprehensive graduation requirements for all BM degrees 1
Core Music Courses
MUSIC 114Musicianship: Tonality1
MUSIC 141Introduction to Musicology1
MUSIC 212Chromatic Musicianship and Form1
MUSIC 214Post-Tonal Musicianship1
MUSIC 235Music in Christian Worship1
MUSIC 236Church Music Practicum0.5
MUSIC 237World Music1
MUSIC 251Conducting (0.50)0.5
MUSIC 252Choral Conducting (0.50)0.5
MUSIC 270Advanced Keyboard Skills (minimum graade of B-)0.25
MUSIC 290Fundamentals of Vocal Development for Instrumentalists0.5
Select one of the following:0.5
Instrumental Conducting (0.50)
Advanced Conducting (0.50)
Select 2 courses from Level III music electives, including at least one upper-level musicology elective (MUSIC 34x)2
Select 3 additional courses from Level II or Level III music electives3
MUSPF 128 Organ Performance Studies4
MUSPF 228 Organ Performance Studies2
Once accepted into the B.M. in Church Music program, students must register for a minimum of 6 semesters of 1.0 credit organ lessons (4 at Level I, subsequent at Level II)
MUSPF 152 Voice Performance Studies: 1 semester.25
Required Performances 2
2 solo performances on a St. Olaf Student Recital (may include Entrance and Continuance)
Entrance examination
Continuance examination
Junior Half Recital
Senior Full Recital
Official Ensemble Participation
Every semester in an official choral ensemble
Required Recital Attendance: 3
10 recitals per semester on campus, with a minimum of 60
Total Credits20

B.M. in Composition (beginning fall 2017)

Worksheet

Admission to the Music Major

See Music Admissions and Scholarship Information

  • application
  • principal-instrument/voice audition repertoire
  • music knowledge and keyboard skills screening
Additional Entrance Requirements

See Entrance Information

  • apply during first or second year of study at St. Olaf, and after completion of one composition course
  • composition portfolio, interview with composition faculty
Program Continuance

See Continuance Information

  • generally during third semester in the program
  • students not approved for continuance are no longer in the BM Composition program
Degree Requirements
General Education
Comprehensive graduation requirements for all BM degrees 1
Core courses
MUSIC 114Musicianship: Tonality1
MUSIC 141Introduction to Musicology1
MUSIC 161Piano Class I (0.25) (minimum grade of B-) 20.25
MUSIC 162Piano Class II (0.25) (minimum grade of B-) 20.25
MUSIC 166Brass Techniques (0.25)0.25
MUSIC 167Percussion Techniques (0.25)0.25
MUSIC 168String Techniques (0.25)0.25
MUSIC 169Woodwind Techiques (0.25)0.25
MUSIC 212Chromatic Musicianship and Form1
MUSIC 214Post-Tonal Musicianship1
MUSIC 223Composition I1
MUSIC 225Music in the Electronic Medium1
MUSIC 237World Music1
MUSIC 251Conducting (0.50)0.5
MUSIC 261Piano Class III (0.25) (minimum grade of B-) 20.25
MUSIC 262Piano Class IV (0.25) (minimum grade of B-) 20.25
MUSIC 314Analysis of Post-Tonal Music1
MUSIC 324Composition II: Orchestration1
MUSPF 326 Comnposition Lesson (4 semesters) (0.25 each)1
Select one of:0.5
Choral Conducting (0.50)
Instrumental Conducting (0.50)
Select 2 courses from Level III music electives, including at least one upper-level musicology elective (MUSIC 34x)2
Selection 3 additional courses from Level II or Level III music electives3
PHYS 252Musical Acoustics1
Performance Studies
6 semesters (0.25 each); 4 in the same instrument/voice1.5
Official Ensemble Participation
Every semester in an official ensemble
Required Performances 3
2 solo performances on a St. Olaf Student Recital
Required Recital Attendance 4
10 recitals per semester on campus, with a minimum of 60
Continuance examination must be completed before senior recital
Required Portfolio
With approval of the composition faculty, the student submits a portfolio of at least 3 compositions previously submitted for Level III composition courses to the music office by May 1 of the senoir year
Senior recital of original works
Total Credits20.5

B.M. in Music Education - Instrumental (beginning Fall 2017)

Please see Overview of St. Olaf's Teacher Education Program and General Requirements and Procedures

Worksheets: VocalInstrumental

Admission to the Music Major

See Music Admissions and Scholarship Information

  • application
  • principal-instrument/voice audition repertoire
  • music knowledge and keyboard skills screening
Additional Entrance Requirements

See Entrance Information

In sophomore year, spring semester:

  • complete application (due October 15, March 15): BM Music Education
  • full academic review
  • recital performance on principal instrument/voice
Program Continuance

See Continuance Information

  • generally in junior year, second semester
  • juried recital performance, academic review, possible interview/conference
  • students not approved for continuance are no longer in the Teacher Education Program
Degree Requirements
General Education
Comprehensive graduation requirements for all BM degrees 1
Core Music Courses
MUSIC 114Musicianship: Tonality1
MUSIC 141Introduction to Musicology1.00
MUSIC 161Piano Class I (0.25) (with grade of B-) 20.25
MUSIC 162Piano Class II (0.25) (with grade of B-) 20.25
MUSIC 165Guitar Techniques0.25
MUSIC 166Brass Techniques (0.25)0.25
MUSIC 167Percussion Techniques (0.25)0.25
MUSIC 168String Techniques (0.25)0.25
MUSIC 169Woodwind Techiques (0.25)0.25
MUSIC 212Chromatic Musicianship and Form1
MUSIC 214Post-Tonal Musicianship1
MUSIC 221Instrumental Literature and Arranging0.50
MUSIC 237World Music1
MUSIC 251Conducting (0.50)0.5
MUSIC 253Instrumental Conducting (0.50)0.50
MUSIC 261Piano Class III (0.25) (with grade of B-) 30.25
MUSIC 290Fundamentals of Vocal Development for Instrumentalists0.50
Select one of the following:.5
Choral Conducting (0.50)
Advanced Conducting (0.50)
Select 2 courses from Level III music electives, including at least one upper-level musicology elective (MUSIC 34x)2
Select 1 additional course from Level II or Level III music electives1
Performance Studies2.5
6 semesters. Prior to entrance into the B.M. Music Education program, lessons on licensure instrument will be 0.25 credits; following entrance, typically spring of sophomore year, lessons will be 0.50 credits.
EDUC 355Teaching of Music in the Elementary School1
EDUC 356Teaching of Music in the Middle and High School (0.50)0.5
EDUC 359Teaching of Instrumental Music (0.50)0.50
Official Ensemble Participation
Every semester in an official instrumental ensemble
1 semester in an official choral ensemble
Required Performances 4
2 solo performances on a St. Olaf Student Recital
2 chamber music performances
Senior Half Recital
Required Recital Attendance 5
10 recitals per semester on campus, with a minimum of 60
Education Courses
Required elective in Art, Theater, or Lyric Theater1
EDUC 231Drugs and Alcohol (0 Cr)0
EDUC 290Educational Psychology1
EDUC 291Standards and Technology (0 Cr)0
EDUC 330Principles of Education, K-121
EDUC 372Counseling and Communication in Schools (0.50)0.5
EDUC 374Reading in the Content Area (0.50)0.5
EDUC 375Differentiated Instruction for Exceptional Learners (0.50).5
Required Elective Education Course: Select One of the Following:1
Urban Schools and Communities (off-campus)
Teaching ESL, K-12
Multicultural Education in Hawaii: Seminar and Practicum (off-campus)
Urban Education Practicum and Seminar (off-campus)
Professional Semester Education Courses
EDUC 381Senior Seminar (0.50)0.5
EDUC 382Human Relations (0 Cr)0
EDUC 385Issues in Education (0.50)0.5
EDUC 389Student Teaching (3.0)3
Total Credits26.5

B.M. in Music Education - Vocal (beginning Fall 2017)

Please see Overview of St. Olaf's Teacher Education Program and General Requirements and Procedures

Worksheets: VocalInstrumental

Admission to the Music Major

See Music Admissions and Scholarship Information

  • application
  • principal-instrument/voice audition repertoire
  • music knowledge and keyboard skills screening
Additional Entrance Requirements

See Entrance Information

In sophomore year, spring semester:

  • complete application (due October 15, March 15): BM Music Education
  • full academic review
  • recital performance on principal instrument/voice
Program Continuance

See Continuance Information

  • generally in junior year, second semester
  • juried recital performance, academic review, possible interview/conference
  • students not approved for continuance are no longer in the Teacher Education Program
Degree Requirements
General Education
Comprehensive graduation requirements for all BM degrees 1
Core Music Courses
MUSIC 114Musicianship: Tonality1
MUSIC 141Introduction to Musicology1.00
MUSIC 161Piano Class I (0.25) (with a grade of B-) 20.25
MUSIC 162Piano Class II (0.25) (with a grade of B-) 20.25
MUSIC 165Guitar Techniques0.25
MUSIC 212Chromatic Musicianship and Form1
MUSIC 214Post-Tonal Musicianship1
MUSIC 237World Music1
MUSIC 251Conducting (0.50)0.5
MUSIC 252Choral Conducting (0.50)0.50
Select one of the following:0.5
Instrumental Conducting (0.50)
Advanced Conducting (0.50)
MUSIC 261Piano Class III (0.25) (with a grade of B-) 30.25
MUSIC 262Piano Class IV (0.25) (with a grade of B-)0.25
MUSIC 287Choral Literature I (0.50)0.50
MUSIC 291Vocal Development and Pedagogy0.25
MUSIC 292Vocal Pedagogy II0.25
Select 2 courses from Level III music electives, including at least one upper-level musicology elective (MUSIC 34x)2
Select 1.75 additional courses from Level II or Level III music electives1.75
Performance Studies2.5
6 semesters. Prior to entrance into the BM Music Education program, lessons on licensure instrument will be 0.25 credits; following entrance, typically spring of sophomore year, lessons will be 0.50 credits.
EDUC 355Teaching of Music in the Elementary School1
EDUC 356Teaching of Music in the Middle and High School (0.50)0.5
EDUC 358Teaching of Vocal Music in the Secondary School (0.50)0.50
Official Ensemble Participation
Every semester in an official choral ensemble
Required Performances 4
2 solo performances on a St. Olaf Student Recital
2 vocal chamber music performances
Senior Half Recital
Required Recital Attendance 5
10 recitals per semester on campus, with a minimum of 60
Professional Education
Required elective in Art, Theater, or Lyric Theater1
EDUC 231Drugs and Alcohol (0 Cr)0
EDUC 290Educational Psychology1
EDUC 291Standards and Technology (0 Cr)0
EDUC 330Principles of Education, K-121
EDUC 372Counseling and Communication in Schools (0.50)0.5
EDUC 374Reading in the Content Area (0.50)0.5
EDUC 375Differentiated Instruction for Exceptional Learners (0.50).5
Required Elective Education Course: Select One of the Following:1
Urban Schools and Communities (off-campus)
Teaching ESL, K-12
Multicultural Education in Hawaii: Seminar and Practicum (off-campus)
Urban Education Practicum and Seminar (off-campus)
Professional Semester Education Courses
EDUC 381Senior Seminar (0.50)0.5
EDUC 382Human Relations (0 Cr)0
EDUC 385Issues in Education (0.50)0.5
EDUC 389Student Teaching (3.0)3
Total Credits26.5

B.M. with Elective Studies (beginning fall 2017)

Worksheet

Admission to the Music Major

See Music Admissions and Scholarship Information

  • application
  • principal-instrument/voice audition repertoire
  • music knowledge and keyboard skills screening
Additional Entrance Requirements

Music Major Entrance Information

  • applicants must be already-enrolled music majors (BA or BM) and may apply as early as first year, spring semester; application packets available in the music office (CHM 101) (due October 15, March 15)
  • identify music and elective studies advisors
  • application portfolio, including explanation of intended integration between music and the area of elective studies, list of proposed elective courses and other learning experiences, draft proposal for synthesis project
  • performance audition
  • academic review, interview
Program Continuance

Music Major Continuance Information

  • at the end of third semester in the program, not later than Junior year, spring semester
  • students not approved for continuance are no longer in the BM Elective Studies program
Degree Requirements
General Education
Comprehensive graduation requirements for all BM degrees 1
Core Music Courses
MUSIC 114Musicianship: Tonality1
MUSIC 141Introduction to Musicology1
MUSIC 161Piano Class I (0.25) (with a grade of B-) 20.25
MUSIC 162Piano Class II (0.25) (with a grade of B-) 20.25
MUSIC 212Chromatic Musicianship and Form1
MUSIC 214Post-Tonal Musicianship1
MUSIC 237World Music1
MUSIC 251Conducting (0.50)0.5
MUSIC 261Piano Class III (0.25) (with a grade of B-) 30.25
MUSIC 298Independent Study (Synthesis Project: Capstone project that combines Music with the second discipline)1
Select 3 courses from Level III music electives, including at least one upper-level musicology elective (MUSIC 34x)3
Select 5 additional courses from Level II and Level III music electives5
Performance Studies Lessons
6 semesters (0.25 credit prior to admission into BM Elective Studies and 0.5 credit after admission, with a minimum of 4 semesters of 0.5 credit lessons)2.5
Official Ensemble Participation
Every semester in an official ensemble
Required Performances 4
2 solo performances on a St. Olaf Student Recital
Required Application Process
Entrance examination as outlined in the catalog
Continuance examination as outlined in the catalog
Required Recital Attendance 5
10 recitals per semester, with a minimum of 60
Electives in secondary field of study6
Total Credits23.75

Music Performance Studies

Music performance studies provide a direct opportunity to think and speak the language of music. Lessons integrate aspects of music's cultural and historical contexts, its theoretical properties, and the physical and psychological facets of performance. Music performance studies earn ALS-A credit. A full credit (4 semesters at the 0.25 credit level) of study on a single instrument or voice is required to meet the ALS-A comprehensive graduation requirement. All music performance studies courses are repeatable up to a total of eight times (ten times if a student is pursuing the double-degree option).

Variable credit private lessons are available in bassoon, clarinet, collaborative piano, composition, cornet, euphonium, flute, English horn, French horn, Hardanger fiddle, harp, harpsichord, oboe, organ, percussion, piano, jazz piano, saxophone, string bass, trombone, trumpet, tuba, viola, violin, violoncello, and voice. Lessons are catalogued as level I and level II Music Performance Studies (MUSPF) courses, and course numbers are referenced in the St. Olaf class and lab schedule.

Music performance studies are offered at three credit levels:

  • 0.25 credit: weekly half-hour lessons, daily minimum one-hour practice expectation
  • 0.50 credit: weekly one-hour lessons, daily minimum two-hour practice expectation
  • 1.00 credit: weekly one-hour lessons, daily minimum three-hour practice expectation

Registration for all applied music lessons is processed through the Music Office (HOM 245). Elective private study for non-music majors (0.25 credit) is available on a space-available basis to students demonstrating sufficient skill level gained through prior study.

All Bachelor of Music students and all Bachelor of Arts Music majors receive a lesson scholarship for principal instrument/voice study.

For all elective and secondary-instrument/voice performance studies, students are assessed a fee of $490 per 0.25 credit. Fees will be refunded only if a student drops the course by the 6th day of classes each semester. No refund is given thereafter.

Enrolled students are expected to participate in studio classes, attend music department-approved events, and fulfill performance-related requirements as detailed by individual instructors. An individual performance jury is required each semester.

To perform solo on any official recital, students must be concurrently enrolled in lessons on the performing instrument/voice.

Music Courses

MUSIC 112: Introduction to Musicianship

First-semester music majors begin formal musicianship studies. Students perform basic melodies and rhythms at sight, and notate dictations of basic rhythms, melodies and harmonic progressions. Students also analyze and compose Western tonal music employing the rubrics of rhythm and meter, pitch, intervals, scales, tertian chords, inversions, harmonic progression, and SATB voice leading. Offered annually in the fall semester.
Prerequisite: concurrent registration in MUSIC 161 (or placement into a higher level of keyboard proficiency).

MUSIC 114: Musicianship: Tonality

Second-semester music majors continue formal musicianship studies. Students perform rhythms and melodies at sight. Students also analyze and compose Western tonal music that employs non-dominant seventh chords, applied chords, sequences, modulations, and small forms. These topics are closely integrated into melodic and harmonic dictations. Offered annually in the spring semester.
Prerequisite: MUSIC 112. Concurrent registration in MUSIC 162 (or placement into a higher level of keyboard proficiency).

MUSIC 130: The Music Spectrum

Designed for students with little or no background in music, this hands-on course presents the fundamental materials of music through creative keyboard experiences, music listening, music reading, and aural and visual analysis. Students gain a basic introduction to the piano and to music notation and music theory. Offered during Interim.

MUSIC 131: The Art of Music

Primarily for non-music majors, this course presents the fundamental materials of music and exposes students to the development of styles, ideals, practices, and technologies that provide context for listening with understanding. Through a study of landmark works from the 17th to the 20th century, students develop and practice listening techniques that sharpen critical perception and open the door to a fuller enjoyment of the musical arts. The ability to read musical scores is helpful but not required. Activity fee. Generally offered annually.

MUSIC 132: Orchestral Music

Students gain an overview of the history and development of orchestral music by looking at style, instrumentation, and musical vocabulary in a substantial selection of landmark works. Students attend four professional orchestral concerts and/or rehearsals in Minneapolis/St. Paul. The ability to read musical scores is helpful but not required. Activity fee. Offered during Interim.

MUSIC 134: Rock Music: Style and Context

This course explores the history and evolution of rock music from rhythm and blues through the present. In addition to covering stylistic trends and significant artists, emphasis is placed on the analysis of rock styles and on the social contexts in which rock music has been and continues to be performed and received. No formal training in music is necessary. Offered during summer.

MUSIC 135: From Mahler to Madonna: 20th Century Music

This course explores the relationship between concert music and popular music of the 20th century. Students learn the basic elements of music and critical listening skills, apply those skills to a variety of music from concert and popular styles, and analyze the relationship between the styles. Students use a variety of activities, including group work and individual presentations, to achieve these goals. Generally offered annually.

MUSIC 136: American Popular Music through the Lens of Prince

At the beginning of Prince's career, this prolific Minnesotan drew on a breadth of genres unprecedented for a popular musician in America. His live performances in particular present a sonic history of American popular music since the mid-20th century. Beginning from specific pieces, the class performs an archeology of 20th- and early 21st-century music to consider genres (including blues, soul, R&B, funk, and rock) and issues in music technology, spirituality, gender, sexuality and race. Counts toward music, American studies, race and ethnic studies, women's and gender studies majors; and race and ethnic studies and women's and gender studies concentrations. Offered occasionally.

MUSIC 141: Introduction to Musicology

This course introduces students to the study of music in cultural and historical perspective. Students explore a broad array of classical and vernacular tradtions from throughout the world with the goal of formulating and answering questions about music's nature and about its use by people in diverse times and places. Students also develop essential skills for thinking and writing critically about music-related subjects. Counts toward BA music major and all BM majors. Offered every fall and spring semester.

MUSIC 161: Piano Class I (0.25)

For music majors with little or no prior keyboard experience, this course introduces basic keyboard patterns and technical foundations, applied music theory, harmonization and transposition, and playing by ear. Development of sight playing skill is a central focus. Class sessions include reading, ensemble playing, performance, skill development and drill, and structured improvisation. Offered annually in the fall semester.
Prerequisite: concurrent registration in MUSIC 112.

MUSIC 162: Piano Class II (0.25)

In this continuation of MUSIC 161, students further develop their reading fluency and technical skill, and work with more advanced harmonic idioms. Class activities include harmonization and transposition, score reading, performance, by-ear playing, and improvisation. A grade of B- or higher satisfies Piano Proficiency Level 2 requirements. Offered annually in the spring semester.
Prerequisite: MUSIC 161, completion of Piano Proficiency Level 1, or audition placement. Concurrent registration in MUSIC 114.

MUSIC 163: Intro Alexander Technique (0.25)

The course addresses the theory and practical application of F. M. Alexander's discoveries about the process of human coordination. Students learn to apply the Alexander Technique to their practice and performance activities. Offered annually in the spring semester. This course explores physiological approaches to well-being in performing artists. Students examine how their own physiological systems are organized in activity; learn how to overcome tension and anxiety when performing and to teach others how to do so; and develop optimum coordination and wellness as musicians. Offered annually in the spring semester.

MUSIC 164: Voice Class (0.25)

Through group instruction, students encounter the fundamentals of singing and an introduction to song literature. In-class performance is required. May be repeated once. Offered each semester.

MUSIC 165: Guitar Techniques

Students learn the basics of guitar playing as well as how to teach guitar classes. Course topics include: learning to play guitar at a basic level; tuning and maintaining a guitar; common performance issues and possible solutions; best practices for teaching class guitar; materials, methods and assessments for teaching guitar classes; the guitar as a tool for composition; technology for teaching, learning or composing for guitar. Required for BM music education majors. Others may register if space allows. Offered annually in fall semester.

MUSIC 166: Brass Techniques (0.25)

Students learn basic performance practice on core instruments in each instrument family. Additional topics include: common performance issues and their possible solution; Best Practices in teaching and learning core instruments of the family; and technology for teaching, learning, or composing for instruments as appropriate. Offered annually in the spring semester.
Prerequisite: permission of instructor required for students not majoring in theory/composition or music education.

MUSIC 167: Percussion Techniques (0.25)

Students learn basic performance practice on core instruments in each instrument family. Additional topics include: common performance issues and their possible solution; Best Practices in teaching and learning core instruments of the family; and technology for teaching, learning, or composing for instruments as appropriate. Offered annually in the spring semester.
Prerequisite: permission of instructor required for students not majoring in theory/composition or music education.

MUSIC 168: String Techniques (0.25)

Students learn basic performance practice on core instruments in each instrument family. Additional topics include: common performance issues and their possible solution; Best Practices in teaching and learning core instruments of the family; and technology for teaching, learning, or composing for instruments as appropriate. Offered annually in the fall semester.
Prerequisite: permission of instructor required for students not majoring in theory/composition or music education.

MUSIC 169: Woodwind Techiques (0.25)

Students learn basic performance practice on core instruments in each instrument family. Additional topics include: common performance issues and their possible solution; Best Practices in teaching and learning core instruments of the family; and technology for teaching, learning, or composing for instruments as appropriate. Offered annually in the fall semester.
Prerequisite: declared music education or composition major or permission of the instructor.

MUSIC 212: Chromatic Musicianship and Form

Third-semester music majors continue formal musicianship studies. Students perform advanced rhythms and increasingly chromatic melodies at sight. Students analyze and compose Western tonal music that employs modal mixture, Neapolitan chords, augmented-sixth chords, and remote modulations, all of which are closely integrated into melodic and harmonic dictations. Students analyze the principle movement-length forms. Offered annually in the fall semester.
Prerequisite: MUSIC 114.

MUSIC 214: Post-Tonal Musicianship

Fourth-semester music majors continue formal musicianship studies. Students analyze and compose Western art music in styles from 1875 to the present, including late-nineteenth-century chromaticism, serialism and set theory, impressionism and neoclassicism, and blues and jazz styles. Performance and dictation studies follow these topics closely, including an introduction to jazz improvisation. Offered annually.

MUSIC 220: Instrumentation for Vocalists (0.25)

Intended for vocal music education and choral church music students, this course introduces fundamental characteristics of orchestra and band instruments, including ranges and transpositions. Students study and learn to use basic approaches to scoring, orchestration, and arranging. Offered fall semester 2016-17 and alternate years.
Prerequisite: MUSIC 214.

MUSIC 221: Instrumental Literature and Arranging

The music found in rehearsal folders plays a pivotal role in shaping the curricular focus of a school band or orchestra. This class helps students develop skills in assessing, selecting, and creating high-quality music literature appropriate for instructing instrumental ensembles in elementary and secondary schools. A comprehensive review of recommended published repertoire culminates in programming projects. Additionally, students acquire the technical craft and artistic sensibilities needed to create successful arrangements for instrumental ensembles. Counts toward BA music major and all BM majors. Required for BM music instrumental education majors. Offered alternate years in fall semester.
Prerequisite: MUSIC 212 and MUSIC 214.

MUSIC 223: Composition I

Students are introduced to a number of compositional techniques and apply them in creating original works of music and hearing them performed. Participants listen to important 20th- and 21st-century compositions, and discuss current trends in music, the changing role of the composer in society, and practical composition issues. Offered each semester.
Prerequisite: MUSIC 114, or permission of instructor.

MUSIC 225: Music in the Electronic Medium

This course is a hands-on study of the science, aesthetics, history and current practices of electronic music. Creative projects include work with MIDI synthesizers and sequencers, as well as digital sampling and software synthesis. Offered during Interim 2016-2017 and alternate years. Counts toward media studies concentration.
Prerequisite: sophomore standing or above.

MUSIC 226: Coding Music

Most music encountered today is either processed by computer or created entirely digitally. This course provides an introduction to the creation of computer music using programming languages and emphasizing object-oriented programming. Students develop skills in abstract and quantitative reasoning in a musical context. They develop their ability to recognize and employ musical patterns and structures in creating new pieces of music. Topics include digital synthesis, timbral design, live coding, and intonation. Offered periodically.
Prerequisite: a basic knowledge of musical theory or notation is helpful but not necessary.

MUSIC 229: Jazz Improvisation (0.50)

Students learn to create improvised solos based on standard jazz practice from different historical eras. To internalize the styles of jazz masters from different time periods, participants transcribe recorded jazz solos by ear and perform them in class. Students gain appreciation of and experience with different harmonic and scalar conceptions through performing and analyzing selected jazz solos. Open to instrumentalists and vocalists. Offered annually in the spring semester.

MUSIC 231: History of Jazz

This course presents a study of the historical development of jazz, from its roots in blues and ragtime at the "beginning" of the 20th century to the present, focusing on its principal forms and styles, its role in American culture, and contributions of major artists. Offered periodically. Counts towards American studies and race and ethnic studies majors and race and ethnic studies and Africa and the Americas concentrations.

MUSIC 232: America's Hit Parade

An introduction to American sacred, art, folk, and popular music from ca. 1650 to the present. Students examine distinctive styles and forms of selected musical "hits" and consider how they reflect American culture and values. Intended for non-music majors, the course covers basic listening skills, vocabulary, and forms. The ability to read musical scores is helpful but not required. Offered during Interim. Counts towards American studies major.

MUSIC 235: Music in Christian Worship

Students study the musical history of hymnody and its relationship to the history of the church. In addition, this course explores the Biblical Psalms and their use in worship of the church and includes references to their musical settings in Gregorian chant, Anglican chant, responsorial settings, and choral music. Offered during Interim 2017-18 and alternate years.

MUSIC 236: Church Music Practicum

Students develop skills and study materials essential to planning and leading worship and training/rehearsing ensembles in a church music program in various traditions. Musical topics include rehearsing and conducting from the keyboard, hymn playing in various styles, playing from chord symbols, global percussion and handbell techniques. Repertoire includes choral music for all ages and for all parts of the church year. Students also explore current issues in church music, the vocation/philosophy of the church musician, organization and administration. Counts toward BA music major and all BM majors. Required for BM church major. Offered alternate years in spring semester.

MUSIC 237: World Music

An introduction to the diversity of musics on Earth. Topics include performance practice, methods for analysis and comparison of various musics, and interdisciplinary approaches to studying the powerful influence of music in human life. Offered annually in the fall semester. Counts toward race and ethnic studies major and concentration and educational studies concentration.

MUSIC 241: History and Literature of Music I

Students encounter the history and development of Western European music from the Middle Ages to ca. 1750 and study the genres and styles of music from monophonic chant to concerted music of the Baroque. Offered annually in the fall semester.
Prerequisite: MUSIC 114.

MUSIC 242: History And Literature of Music II

Continuing the study begun in MUSIC 241, students encounter the history and development of Western European music from ca. 1750 to the present and study the major forms, styles and representative literature of the Classic and Romantic eras and the 20th and 21st centuries. Offered annually in the spring semester.
Prerequisite: MUSIC 114.

MUSIC 245: Music and Social Justice

Students study how music can engage and advocate for those on the margins of society, inspiring social justice movements. Analyzing historical and current events, class members design a musical project that can empower a people, group or organization in addressing moral and social problems such as racial inequality, rural or urban violence, or prison reform. A Christian normative framework, along with religious and secular alternatives, help guide the ethics implications pertaining to this subject. Offered periodically during Interim.
Prerequisite: BTS-T or permission of instructor.

MUSIC 251: Conducting (0.50)

Students learn basic conducting gestures (with and without baton) through exercises in meter patterns, preparatory beats and cut-offs, cueing, dynamics, fermata, articulations, phrasing, left hand independence, and face/eye usage. Offered annually in the spring semester.
Prerequisite: MUSIC 114 or permission of instructor.

MUSIC 252: Choral Conducting (0.50)

Students learn conducting techniques for choral literature including research-based rehearsal techniques, vocal preparation, score study, and video self-evaluation of gesture and rehearsal. Course work also includes observation of conductors on campus and in the community. Offered annually in the fall semester.
Prerequisite: MUSIC 251.

MUSIC 253: Instrumental Conducting (0.50)

Students learn conducting techniques for instrumental literature, including rehearsal techniques, score preparation, and reading full score. Repertoire includes characteristic examples from standard band and orchestra literature. Students gain practical experience in conducting an instrumental ensemble. Course work includes observation of conducting faculty. Offered annually in the spring semester.
Prerequisite: MUSIC 251.

MUSIC 261: Piano Class III (0.25)

This advanced piano class for music majors only emphasizes sight playing, score reading, harmonization and transposition, advanced harmonic idioms, improvisation, ensemble playing, and performance preparation. A grade of B- or higher satisfies Piano Proficiency Level 3 requirements. Offered annually in the fall semester.
Prerequisite: MUSIC 162, completion of Piano Proficiency Level 2, or audition placement; concurrent registration in MUSIC 212 recommended.

MUSIC 262: Piano Class IV (0.25)

This continuation of 261 emphasizes sight playing, score reading, harmonization and transposition, more advanced improvisation and harmonic usage, performance preparation, and leadership from the keyboard. A grade of B- or higher satisfies Piano Proficiency Level 4 requirements. Offered annually in the spring semester.
Prerequisite: MUSIC 261, completion of Piano Proficiency 3, or audition placement; concurrent registration in MUSIC 214 recommended.

MUSIC 263: Lyric Diction I (0.25)

Students study and practice principles for singing in English and Italian with good pronunciation, enunciation, and expression. Course content includes phonetic analysis using the International Phonetic Alphabet and identifying and exercising the phonemic features of English and Italian through class performances and listening assignments. Offered fall semester 2016-2017 and alternate years.
Prerequisite: two semesters of voice lessons.

MUSIC 264: Lyric Diction II (0.25)

Students study and practice principles for singing in French and German with good pronunciation, enunciation, and expression. Course content includes phonetic analysis using the International Phonetic Alphabet and identifying and exercising the phonemic features of French and German through class performances and listening assignments. Offered spring semester 2016-2017 and alternate years.
Prerequisite: MUSIC 263 and two semesters of voice lessons.

MUSIC 267: Advanced Acting For The Lyric Stage

This studio course focuses on advanced techniques of acting and singing for the musical stage with emphasis on opera. Students explore voice, movement, improvisation, and characterization at an advanced level. Participants receive coaching in musical and dramatic style through solo and small ensemble literature and prepare scenes for class performance. The course culminates with public performances of a fully staged and costumed lyric theater work. May be repeated once. A production fee will be charged to all students participating in the production. Offered annually in the fall semester.
Prerequisites: two semesters of voice study or permission of instructor.

MUSIC 268: Opera Creation Residency in the Schools: Civic Engagement

This course is designed for students interested in civic engagement in the arts and arts fusion projects. Participants mentor students from a local elementary school in an Opera Creation Residency as the elementary students compose and perform their own original works. The course culminates in staged public performances. Enrollment is subject to a fall interview/audition.Open to all students. May be repeated once. A class fee may be required. Offered during Interim 2017-2018 and alternate years.

MUSIC 269: Opera Workshop

Participants prepare for performance of a one-act opera or opera scenes. Students receive coaching and performance experience through individual and group singing/acting exercises. The course culminates with staged and costumed public performances. Open to all students. May be repeated once. A class fee may be required. Offered Interim 2015-2016 and alternate years.

MUSIC 270: Advanced Keyboard Skills

For music majors with organ or piano as their principal instrument, this course provides intensive practical experience with and development of functional keyboard skills including sight-reading, score reading, keyboard harmonization, transposition, improvisation, and figured bass/continuo realization. Open to other advanced organists and pianists by permission of instructor. A grade of B- or higher satisfies the keyboard proficiency level 4 requirements.
Prerequisite: concurrent registration in, or successful completion of, MUSIC 114. Counts toward BA music major and all BM majors. Offered alternate years.

MUSIC 271: Music Performance Science

Drawing from the fields of biology, neuroscience, physics, and psychology, this course introduces students to the biological and psychological aspects of music performance. Students develop an understanding of the origins of performance-related injury, the mechanism of hearing, the sources of workplace stress in the lives of professional musicians. Each student will design and complete an exercise program tailored to their individual needs as a musician. Offered Interim alternate years.

MUSIC 275: Instrumental Chamber Music (0.25)

Through regular rehearsals and coaching sessions, new or already-formed chamber groups prepare and perform selected literature, learn about related repertoire, and cultivate observation, communication, and leadership skills. Typical ensembles include string quartets, brass or woodwind quintets, piano trios, saxophone quartets, etc. May be repeated. Offered each semester.
Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

MUSIC 281: Vocal Solo Literature I (0.25)

Students survey the solo art song repertoire of Germany, Italy, and Spain. The course highlights the significant features and development of the art song, and provides context, approaches, and resources for studying this literature. Course work includes in-class performance. Offered fall semester 2017-18 and alternate years.
Prerequisites: MUSIC 214, MUSIC 241, MUSIC 242, or permission of instructor; MUSIC 263 and MUSIC 264 preferred.

MUSIC 282: Vocal Solo Literature II (0.25)

Students survey the solo art song repertoire of France, England, the United States, and the Nordic countries. This course highlights the significant features and development of the art song, and provides context, approaches, and resources for studying this literature. Coursework includes in-class performance. Offered spring semester 2017-18 and alternate years.
Prerequisites: MUSIC 214, MUSIC 241, MUSIC 242, or permission of instructor; MUSIC 263 and MUSIC 264 preferred.

MUSIC 283: Piano Literature (0.50)

Beginning with the 17th century, students trace the evolution of literature for piano through the major works of such diverse composers as Bach, Boulez, Couperin, and Cage. Course content includes lectures, readings, listening, analysis, performance, and written assignments. Special attention is paid to performance practice traditions and historical context. Offered spring semester 2017-18 and alternate years.
Prerequisites: MUSIC 214, MUSIC 241, and MUSIC 242, or permission of instructor.

MUSIC 287: Choral Literature I (0.50)

This course is a study of the smaller forms of choral music from the Renaissance to the present with an emphasis on music suitable for junior and senior high school and church choirs. Students study scores and recordings and discuss representative style features and characteristics, interpretation, and conducting problems. Offered annually in the spring semester.
Prerequisites: MUSIC 214, MUSIC 241, and MUSIC 242 and junior standing.

MUSIC 290: Fundamentals of Vocal Development for Instrumentalists

Through group instruction, students encounter the fundamentals of singing and an introduction to song literature. In-class performance is required. Additionally during the second half of the course, class participants are introduced to the principles of vocal pedagogy as applied to the child and adolescent voice in the class or ensemble rehearsal. There is an emphasis on understanding the developing young voice and establishing good vocal habits with healthy pedagogical techniques as well as exploration of appropriate choral literature. Counts towards BA music major and all BM majors. Required for BM instrumental music education majors. Offered alternate years in fall semester.
Prerequisite: MUSIC 251 or permission of instructor.

MUSIC 291: Vocal Development and Pedagogy

This course introduces a systematic approach to the study of voice production for use in the studio or classroom. Students examine basic vocal anatomy and physiology approached through body mapping strategies. Students then apply these principles of vocal pedagogy to the child and adolescent voice with emphasis on the developing voice, establishing healthy vocal habits, appropriate teaching techniques, and literature. Counts towards BA music major and all BM majors. Required for BM vocal music education and BM vocal performance majors. Offered annually in fall semester.
Prerequisite: at least three semesters of MUSPF 152: voice lessons, or permission of instructor.

MUSIC 292: Vocal Pedagogy II

This course focuses on applying the foundations of vocal production learned in MUSIC 291 - Vocal Development and Pedagogy to the practice of teaching voice in a solo setting. Students in this course take on a private voice student for the semester and develop a systematic, personalized curriculum for this student. Topics include developing a pedagogical approach to warm-ups and vocalizations, choosing repertoire, vocal registration, vocal acoustics and format training, training different voice types, musical theater belting technique, and the aging voice. Counts toward BA music major and all BM majors. Required for BM vocal music education and BM vocal performance majors. Offered annually in spring semester.
Prerequisite: MUSIC 291.

MUSIC 293: Keyboard Pedagogy (0.50)

An introduction to principles, methods and resources for effective and creative music teaching through the piano. Students observe demonstration teaching at various levels and inindividual and group settings, engage in peer teaching, analyze and perform teaching literature, and discuss topics such as technical development, learning stages and styles, and studio management. Offered spring semester 2016-17 and alternate years.

MUSIC 294: Academic Internship

MUSIC 295: String Literature and Pedagogy (0.50)

Students examine scores and listen to a broad range of string etudes, solos, sonatas, concertos, and orchestral excerpts with attention to notable performers of the past and present. Through required readings, listening assignments, video viewing, discussion, and hands-on teaching, students engage with practical issues of teaching, repertoire selection for beginning and intermediate players, performance and basic studio management.
Prerequisites: MUSIC 214, MUSIC 241, and MUSIC 242 or permission of instructor.

MUSIC 298: Independent Study

MUSIC 312: Counterpoint

To deepen awareness and understanding of performance music, and to gain tools to produce textural interest in composition, students study the contrapuntal techniques of composers from the Renaissance, Baroque, and Modern periods including Palestrina, Bach, and Barber. Offered fall semester 2017-18 and alternate years.
Prerequisite: MUSIC 214.

MUSIC 313: Analysis of Tonal Music

Analysis is a course of discovery, using advanced tools of music theory to examine the ways in which great works of music are put together. Students examine principles of form and style and, using a range of analytical techniques, come to a deeper understanding of tonal music. The course focuses on Classical and Romantic literature, with some work in 20th-century tonality. Offered spring semester 2016-2017 and alternate years.
Prerequisite: MUSIC 214.

MUSIC 314: Analysis of Post-Tonal Music

An analytical study of the wide range of musical styles found in the 20th- and 21st-centuries, this course provides an opportunity to study important modern works and to come to a deeper understanding of their structure and meaning. Students study atonal music theory in depth and examine some of the new approaches to tonality in our time. Offered spring semester 2017-18 and alternate years.
Prerequisite: MUSIC 214.

MUSIC 324: Composition II: Orchestration

Students develop more advanced technique in writing for instruments and voice through individual study in creative composition, focusing on smaller ensembles. May be repeated. Offered every year.
Prerequisite: MUSIC 223.

MUSIC 325: Composition III

This course continues the study in creative composition begun in MUSIC 223 and MUSIC 324 and includes writing for large ensembles. May be repeated. Offered each semester.
Prerequisites: MUSIC 221, MUSIC 223, MUSIC 324, and permission of instructor.

MUSIC 341: Music of the Renaissance Era

An in-depth study of music literature and styles, ca. 1430-1600, with a focus on the role of music in the cultural, political, and ecclesiastical life of the time. Students investigate sacred music from Du Fay to Palestrina and Byrd, secular genres in France, Germany, Italy, and Spain, and the beginnings of independent instrumental music. In addition to lectures and discussion, students engage in listening, score analysis, and significant research and writing.
Prerequisites: MUSIC 241and MUSIC 242.

MUSIC 342: Music of the Baroque Era

An in-depth study of music literature and styles, ca. 1600-1750. Students survey music for vocal chamber ensemble, choirs, and solo and concerted instrumental genres as conceived for church, theater, and chamber settings. Through readings, listening, lectures, discussion, score study, research, and writing, students learn about developments in sacred, instrumental, and dramatic music from Caccini and Monteverdi to Bach and Handel. Counts toward German studies concentration.
Prerequisites: MUSIC 241 and MUSIC 242.

MUSIC 343: Music Of The Classical And Romantic Eras

Intensive study of musical literature between 1750 and 1900. The course begins with the development of the Viennese Classical School (Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven) and continues with European trends in Romantic opera, Lieder, symphony and chamber music (from Rossini through R. Strauss). Counts toward German studies concentration.
Prerequisites: MUSIC 241 and MUSIC 242.

MUSIC 344: Music of the 20th and 21st Centuries

Intensive study of musical masterworks from ca.1890 to the present, focusing on formal and stylistic trends as well as the political, philosophical and economic contexts of Western art and popular music from French impressionism through American hip hop. Course work includes bibliographic instruction, lecture/discussion, and an analytic research paper. Offered spring semester 2016-2017 and alternate years.
Prerequisites: MUSIC 241 and MUSIC 242.

MUSIC 345: Advanced Study in Music History

Students encounter in-depth studies in a specific topic or area of music history. The content and nature of this course are determined by the instructor and the music department. Sample topics include American music, studies in classical music, opera, and folk and pop influences in art music. May be repeated if topic is different. Offered each semester.
Prerequisite: MUSIC 141 or permission of instructor.

MUSIC 354: Advanced Conducting (0.50)

Working with a live instrumental or choral ensemble, students learn and conduct complete movements and/or entire works and encounter a variety of advanced baton techniques. Course activities develop skills in reading, preparing, interpreting and memorizing scores, with further focus on rehearsal procedures, performance practice, and concert programming. Participants are required to observe a variety of rehearsals on- and off-campus. Offered annually in the fall semester. Counts toward management studies concentration.
Prerequisites: MUSIC 252 or MUSIC 253.

MUSIC 364: Vocal Pedagogy (0.25)

This course introduces a systematic pedagogical approach to the study of voice production for use in the studio or classroom. Students examine basic voice physiology, the healthy use and care of the voice, voice problems, and appropriate vocal literature. Offered annually in the fall semester. Counts toward management studies concentration.
Prerequisite: three semesters of voice lessons, one of which may be voice class; or permission of instructor.

MUSIC 365: The Child and Adolescent Voice (0.25)

This course introduces the principles of vocal pedagogy applied to the child and adolescent voice with an emphasis on understanding the developing voice and establishing good vocal habits with appropriate techniques and literature. Offered annually in the fall semester.
Prerequisites: MUSIC 251, completion of one semester of voice or voice class and junior standing, or permission of instructor.

MUSIC 391: Church Music Practicum I (0.25)

Students study the role of music in worship with an emphasis on strategies for developing music groups, including handbells and Orff instruments, in worship and church education. Offered fall semester 2016-17 and alternate years.
Prerequisite: MUSIC 214 or permission of instructor.

MUSIC 392: Church Music Practicum II (0.25)

This course continues the studies begun in 391. Students consider recruitment and music administration, and composing and arranging music for worship. Offered spring semester 2016-2017 and alternate years.
Prerequisite: MUSIC 391.

MUSIC 394: Academic Internship

MUSIC 396: Directed Undergraduate Research

This course provides a comprehensive research opportunity, including an introduction to relevant background material, technical instruction, identification of a meaningful project, and data collection. The topic is determined by the faculty member in charge of the course and may relate to his/her research interests. Offered based on department decision. May be offered as a 1.00 credit course or .50 credit course.
Prerequisite: determined by individual instructor.

MUSIC 398: Independent Research

Chair, 2018-2019

Justin W. Merritt

Professor of Music

composition; theory; instrumentation; electronic music

Steven Amundson

Professor of Music

orchestra; conducting; theory

Kathryn E. Ananda-Owens

Professor of Music

piano; piano literature

Francesca J. Anderegg

Assistant Professor of Music

violin; viola; chamber music

Scott D. Anderson (on leave)

Associate Professor of Music

clarinet; chamber music

Anton Armstrong

Professor of Music

choir; conducting; voice; pedagogy for young voices

Christopher G. Atzinger

Associate Professor of Music

piano; piano literature

Allyss A. Beek

Adjunct Assistant Professor of Music

Linda M. Berger (on leave)

Professor of Music

vocal and instrumental music education

James E. Bobb (on leave fall)

Assistant Professor of Music

organ; church music; choir; chapel cantor

Judy W. Bond

Visiting Professor of Music

Timothy J. Bradley

Instructor in Music

French horn

Sarah C. Burk

Instructor in Music

jazz piano

Steven Campbell

Instructor in Music

tuba

Gabriel Campos Zamora

Adjunct Instructor in Music

clarinet

David M. Carter

Professor of Music

cello; chamber music; string techniques; string literature/pedagogy; music appreciation

David R. Castro

Associate Professor of Music

music theory; counterpoint; advanced analysis

Kurt N. Claussen

Instructor in Music

saxophone; chamber music

Anna Clift

Visiting Instructor in Music

cello

Dan Dressen

Professor of Music, Associate Provost

voice

Julie A. Elhard

Instructor in Music

instrumental early music ensemble

Tracey M. Engleman (on leave spring)

Assistant Professor of Music

voice; vocal pedagogy; vocal literature

Louis K. Epstein

Assistant Professor of Music

musicology

Alison Feldt

Associate Professor of Music

voice

Charles K. Gray

Professor of Music

violin; viola; string literature/pedagogy; chamber music

Arthur Haecker

Visiting Assistant Professor of Music

David Hagedorn

Artist in Residence in Music

jazz bands; percussion; percussion methods; world music

Philip C. Hey

Instructor in Music

drum set

Therees Hibbard

Visiting Associate Professor of Music

choir; voice; voice class; conducting

Paul J. Hill

Instructor in Music

percussion

Martin Hodel

Professor of Music

trumpet; orchestra; chamber music

Christopher Kachian

Adjunct Professor of Music

Mark A. Kelley

Instructor in Music

bassoon

Rehanna Landis Kheshgi

Assistant Professor of Music

April R. Kim

Instructor in Music

Garrett L. Klein

Visiting Instructor in Music

trumpet performance

Dale H. Kruse

Visiting Assistant Professor of Music

voice; lyric theater

Dana L. Maeda

Instructor in Music

oboe; woodwind techniques; chamber music

Timothy Mahr

Professor of Music

band; conducting; composition

Jill Mahr

Instructor in Music

handbell ensembles; flute

Constance K. Martin

Instructor in Music

string bass

James McKeel

Professor of Music

voice; lyric theater

Kent M. McWilliams

Professor of Music; Associate Dean of Fine Arts

piano; piano pedagogy

Mary Anna Mooy

Visiting Assistant Professor of Music

voice; lyric diction; lyric theater

Elinor Niemisto

Instructor in Music

harp

Tori Okwabi

Adjunct Assistant Professor of Music

Nina Olsen

Adjunct Assistant Professor of Music

Paul Ousley

Instructor in Music

string bass

Nancy Paddleford

Professor of Music

piano

James K. N. Palmer

Visiting Assistant Professor of Music

Catherine Ramirez

Artist in Residence in Music

flute; chamber music

Catherine R. Rodland

Artist in Residence in Music

organ; theory

Miriam Scholz-Carlson

Adjunct Instructor in Music

string techniques; Alexander Technique

Wallace Ray Shows

Instructor in Music

violin; viola; chamber music

Audrey J. Slote

Adjunct instructor in Music

cello

Jason Tanksley

Adjunct Instructor in Music

Elizabeth Weis

Instructor in Music

hardanger fiddle

Peter Whitman

Adjunct Instructor in Music

jazz saxophone

Karen K. Wilkerson

Instructor in Music

voice

Wilfred L. Williams

Visiting Assistant Professor of Music

bass-baritone

Herbert E. Winslow

Instructor in Music

French horn

Tesfa Y. Wondemagegnehu

Visiting Instructor of Music

Larry J. Zimmerman

Instructor in Music

trombone; low brass; brass methods